Planet Textile Threads

August 30, 2014

Margaret Cooter

Translating the Iliad

Book 1 took 73 days to stitch (via)
Translating Homer's Iliad is what Silvie Kilgallon is doing - translating its 24 books into stitch. Each greek letter will be a stitch (a cross-stitch), with colours changing throughout the books, starting with red and moving letter by letter so that the final book is blue.

Book 1 is finished, and Book 2 is the longest book. "I need to stitch faster" she says on the project blog, Stitched Iliad.
In progress - any embroiderer would love to see the back (via)
From the Guardian's article:

"I started the project in response to a curator showing me a newly built, empty gallery space and asking me what I would put in it," she said.
"My mind immediately sprang to the Iliad.I'd been researching translation, transmission and reception of text issues, so my immediate question to myself was 'Can I produce a translation of the text that allows an audience of non-classicists to appreciate it without understanding the text itself?' The colour translation was my solution."
The initial red colour scheme was inspired by the war, anger and bloodshed featured in the Iliad, which is believed to have been written between 750 and 650 BC.
...
Research has shown that cultures generally follow a similar order in developing names for colours. Black, white and red appear first, while blue is one of the last colours to be named.
Kilgallon said this was the reason the project starts in the primal colour of red before transitioning to blue, a colour indicative of a more technologically developed society.
She works on her Iliad in public places, "prompting conversations and interactions with an audience receptive to both the story of the Iliad and the story of the stitched Iliad."

Previously, for a project starting in 2011, she has stitched Book I in various ways, aiming to do it "twenty-four times, each time highlighting a different method of analysing the text. My first translation is a simple letter-for-colour substitution, which each letter of the alphabet being substituted for a different colour. When the Iliad was first written down all those years ago, it would not have had the breathings, accents, spaces, or lower case letters which modern classicists would now be familiar with; thus, my translation contains no spaces, punctuation marks, accents, or breathings. Later translations will focus on syntax, metaphor, location, character, etc. Hopefully when it is finally complete, it will be a work of spectacle, aesthetic beauty and complexity worthy of the title of epic."

For instance, here is that work in progress in March 2012 -
The colours are to do with names of characters and family trees.

Later, doubts set in ..."The aim of the first translation and the aim of all the rest is also different: the first translation dealt with metaphor, and how it reveals but also obscures, it dealt with appreciation and understanding. At the moment, I feel like all the rest are just… infograms. They’re just colour-coded charts showing the frequency of names and places. They’re analysing the text in a way which is supposed to be understandable, which seems almost completely at odds with my intentions in the first piece. ... Why do the same thing 24 times, unless you feel the idea is developing further each time (and I don’t think it will)?"

And so the project changed. I can just about imagine what it will look like when it's finished - amazing, in a word - and perhaps this sample of two of the Book I's, displayed during the Lichfield festival, will help you imagine it too -


by Margaret Cooter (noreply@blogger.com) at August 30, 2014 04:11 PM

Hiatus

Following its recent daily changes, and a severe bout of sanding -
the stripey painting is going to have to languish for a while. A rest, a pause, a break. Hiatus.

I've started something new - same size - for which I had a definite starting point in mind ... but it's the first mark you make that determines the future history, isn't it. The first mark was a blog of copper paint
which needed thinning out and then became rather gestural, to be followed by more of the same, in different ways, for instance, blobs sprayed with water -
and then a brushload of really wet yellow paint drawn across the top and left to run down, with more swashbuckling with a small brush, lots of fun! This is how it stands at the moment -
There is an element of stripeyness ... but the new painting seems to have a mind of its own, how good is that? The stripey one wasn't "talking to me" - I wasn't getting much input on what needed doing next. It was all becoming rather automatic.

At the moment the new one is saying "don't you dare go back to the original idea" - which was this -
Sonia Delaunay, 1928 (a dress fabric?) (via)

by Margaret Cooter (noreply@blogger.com) at August 30, 2014 09:57 AM

Cynthia St. Charles

Scraps in Strips

I had my scrap box out to make the potholders and seeing all those scraps inspired me to try using some of them up.  I really enjoy sewing strips together randomly and seeing what I can do with them.  I cut all the blues I could find in my scrap box into strips of varying widths.  These range from 1" to 2" wide.  Now to begin sewing them together.....

by Cynthia St Charles (noreply@blogger.com) at August 30, 2014 06:00 AM

August 29, 2014

Margaret Cooter

Mixed media

The camera takes a look around the studio...
Top row: a layer of yellow paint (inspired by Cy Twombley's Lepanto); lot of biro marks make the paper ripple; snips of fabric (too small for anything else) knotted and strung
Bottom row:  ink and water make a notebook ripple; discharge paste screened onto cotton velvet; pressed flowers bondawebbed under organza

Top row: colour catchers; an inky accident in a Hungarian felt bag; threads - paper, silk, cotton, linen
Bottom row: writing implements, and others, recently used; cutting implements; fabric sorted in drawers by colour

Top row: more fabric behind glass; prints and drawings piled in chronological order; dyeing materials
Bottom row: unused small sketchbooks; pads and loose papers; neglected pens

The "neglected pens" that got this train of thought going are, or rather were, gathering dust in a corner of a cupboard. Thinking to throw out the felt pens - surely they'd be dried out by now, I've had them for 20 years - I also mused that they were not a drawing implement I ever choose to use ... why? because of the dull, flat line they make, and the unwanted darkening of colour when they overlap. But had I explored their mark-making possibilities - of course not.

A few minutes with a pad of scrap paper found that most of the pens were still alive -
As for the mark-making, some variables are: how the pen is held (angle to paper; firmly close to point or loosely at end); direction of line; spacing of lines; pressure on paper; speed of pen across paper. Slowing down was a revelation (I tend to want to Get It Done Quickly).

That was fun, and I really liked the "loose" marks and parallel lines, but I still can't imagine wanting to use felt-tip pens for a project. Hmm, never say never...

(This post is linked to Off The Wall Fridays.)

by Margaret Cooter (noreply@blogger.com) at August 29, 2014 03:18 PM

Tonya R

Quilt Blocks Go Wild

Hey all ya'all. I gotta do a little bit of shameless self-promotion. See this?

 

Shazam! It's the block I redesigned for the book Quilt Blocks Go Wild just published by Leisure Arts.


It's my version of Rail Fence. You know my Dr. Seuss Christmas Quilt? Well this is the way to make it. The easy way I figured out how to do years later...

I've got a mixed opinion of the book. Of course there is my block--which is fabulous-- and made UnRulily. That is, no marking or real fussing - although you do have to pay attention. I love that we were allowed to use photos to illustrate the steps, so I think it's pretty clear. (If not, give me a holler.) I love Malka Dubrowsky's Drunkard's Path redo. I love that the book shows you alternate methods for working.

But. But there are some methods in the book that do not appeal to me in the least. Freezer paper and templates. So this book isn't about Liberation. It's about how to step outside the traditional zone in baby steps. And of course not everyone loves Liberation and UnRuly so hopefully they'll find a way to play that they do like.

The book will be available on Amazon (Quilt Blocks Go Wild) and at JoAnn's stores. Possibly other places as well.

While I've got you all here, can I make a request for blocks? I know I don't deserve them since I still have several UFOs-worth of wonderful gifties from readers. I do, I know. If you don't worry about it eventually becoming a quilt and just think of it as a gift to Lazy Gal, who looks at it and feels loved... I'd appreciate it. Not that I'm trying to guilt you into anything ;-)

I'd like to make a love quilt for Pokey. I still miss her so much.


I have a quilt in mind. I know what the components are, but not how the quilt will look. I'd love to receive Pokey-colored blocks. White, cream, all those lovely shades of brown and dark brown/black accents. I called her my cappuccino girl - coffee with cream. And of course turquoise/cyan for her beautiful eyes and pink/red for her nose and paw pads (and love).

And the type of block? It's a love quilt. UnRuly L-O-V-E letters and UnRuly XOXOXOXO hugs and kisses. And wonky hearts.  Individual letters, or joined together. Just one or several. Nothing too big please unless you're piecing the letter fabric. Any questions, just ask.

Summary: UnRuly Letters (as found in Word Play Quilts)  E, L, O, V, and X and wonky hearts in white, cream, and all sorts of brown with hints of turquoise, red, pink, and black. (not that you have to have all those colors in one block). The goal is to have a quilt for the next book (yes, I'm finally working on one) so it's gotta be UnRuly.

If you make some letters/hearts and they don't come out well? Don't throw them away. Send them anyway. The UnRuly Orphanage takes in all sorts of strays.

To be even more obnoxious: as always, I'd love any spare orphan UnRuly letters you'd care to send. And teensy bits of ugly ugly fabric in light colors. I've got way too many dark fabrics in my stash...

I hate sunless, overcast days. This blog post makes me sound so sad and dreary and that's really not the case. I'm enjoying the Olympics and sewing. Yes, I'm sewing again and book plotting. woohoo! And enjoying the company of the cats. Even the little stinkers, Annabelle (or should it be Annabowl?):


and Cooper:


They both love the dishwasher, why I don't know. Shiny cave to explore, oh boy! These are older photos, amazing how much they grow in just a couple of weeks.

Later, gators!

by Tonya Ricucci (noreply@blogger.com) at August 29, 2014 12:48 PM

Olga Norris

One minus (with side benefits) and one definite plus

Last year started with me drifting somewhat, and so I signed up for two external stimulae: the first was A Letter A Week 2013
I largely failed at that discipline, but I found that indeed the thinking did stimulate me, and I still have an ongoing project (in a layby at present) which partly grew out of that. I also learned again what I already really knew: that regular deadlines and my creativity just do not coincide!
The other stimulus was the Bookmark project.  I have always loved bookmarks and over the years have amassed quite a collection.  When on a strict budget, they are usually the item affordable in museum and gallery shops, and it is fun trying to match the bookmark to the book being read. 
 
I also print my own bookmarks for friends from time to time.  So this project fitted right in, and with it comes the bonus of receiving a whole bundle of other folks' bookmarks!
I have received my copies of this year's batch
which includes my own, and two of my favourites are by printmakers whose blogs I follow: Elizabeth Banfield and Jacqui Dodds.  All the bookmarks in this current project: XII will be put online next month sometime (here is a link to project XI's participants and their bookmarks).  The whole experience has been such a positive one for me that I've signed up again for the next bookmark project.

by Olga Norris (noreply@blogger.com) at August 29, 2014 10:34 AM

Neki Rivera

nation keepers




shinjuku 7:30 a.m
 last august weekend! enjoy

neki desu
Creative Commons License

by noreply@blogger.com (neki desu) at August 29, 2014 08:00 AM

Cynthia St. Charles

Wrapped Up and Ready for Bingo Night.

While I was messing around with the potholders, I decided to go ahead and just get them ready to put on the prize table next month.  I rolled two potholders together and tied them with ribbons.  Now I have five prizes ready to walk out the door with me for September's Iris Club meeting.  The next few weeks will be very busy so I am really happy I was able to get this project finished well in advance.

by Cynthia St Charles (noreply@blogger.com) at August 29, 2014 06:00 AM

Rayna Gillman

progress

The ice machine is fixed, the stitches are out of my finger, my house guests have left, and I have three quilts stitched that need the facings sewn down and sleeves on.  Too bad I am not a tv watcher.

It has been one exhausting week, with all the commotion and comings/goings of construction/destruction guys, plumbers, and the appliance man.  The demo guys will be back early in the morning to take away the fans, replace part of the floor, and put the ice maker back user the island -- with the water alarm attached!

While I was rummaging around in my sewing room tonight, I found a piece or cloth I had printed about 5 years ago. Ha-I wondered where it was and now I know.  I shall contemplate it for a few days before I decide what to do with it.


Enough activity for today -- or I should say yesterday.  It is already tomorrow.


by noreply@blogger.com (Rayna) at August 29, 2014 04:41 AM

August 28, 2014

Carol McFee

Rusty Fabrics

In the last post back in April, I made a lot of rusted fabrics and papers while I was on the Alice Fox course,  I decided it was time to start using them up along with a lot more rusted fabrics created last year.
First I thought I would make a few more.
(apologies I put Amanda Fox. have now corrected it to Alice Fox)

Fabric wrapped around rusty tin cans


 
Fabric wrapped around 6" nails



A selection of old and new rusty fabrics









The fabric below is a very loose weave easy to stitch into, can't remember the name of it but it is the one used in Jan Beaney and Jean Littlejohn's DVD, available from ArtVan Go.

I stapled three pieces together before I rusted it then hand stitched in each portion.


I  stapled a whole piece of fabric before rusting for this sample below.



I placed a template over the cloth so I could judge where the stitching would go.








Three hearts ready for Helfa Gelf open studio's next month




by Carol McFee (noreply@blogger.com) at August 28, 2014 12:52 PM

Margaret Cooter

Poetry Thursday - Pathology of Colours by Dannie Abse

Bruise colours (via)

Pathology of Colours

I know the colour rose, and it is lovely,
but not when it ripens in a tumour;
and healing greens, leaves and grass, so springlike,
in limbs that fester are not springlike.

I have seen red-blue tinged with hirsute mauve
in the plum-skin face of a suicide.
I have seen white, china white almost, stare
from behind the smashed windscreen of a car.

And the criminal, multi-coloured flash
of an H-bomb is no more beautiful
than an autopsy when the belly's opened -
to show cathedral windows never opened.

So in the simple blessing of a rainbow,
in the bevelled edge of a sunlit mirror,
I have seen, visible, Death's artifact
like a soldier's ribbon on a tunic tacked.

- Dannie Abse (via /litmed.med.nyu.edul, where you can listen to him reading the poem.

(Also on that site he says: "I felt that poetry shouldn't be an escape from reality, but rather an immersion into reality, and part of my reality was, indeed, my hospital life at the time. And so I became prepared to write poems which had medical undertones. Louis Pasteur once said (talking of scientific inspiration), 'Chance favors the prepared mind,' and my mind was prepared to write poems that were medically colored. In the mid-60's, I wrote a poem called 'Pathology of Colours,' and it proved to be one of a number that I've written over the years which are medically thematic.")


Dannie Abse is regarded as one of the most important Welsh writers of the 20th century. While a medical student, he once met Dylan Thomas - an influence on much of his early work. He wrote novels as well as poetry, and his connection with Wales is interesting - a non-Welsh-speaking Jew, he has lived most of his life in London, and been published there. He was born in Cardiff in 1923 and after a spell at Cardiff University, went to London in 1943 to start his medical training - and "took to the café society in Swiss Cottage like a duck to water."

He has written or edited 16 or more books of poetry - most recently "Speak, Old Parrot" (2013), and also several novels, among which The Strange Case of Dr Simmonds & Dr Glas (2002) was longlisted for the Booker Prize.

by Margaret Cooter (noreply@blogger.com) at August 28, 2014 09:16 AM

Dijanne Cevaal

Thank YOU !Target Reached but You can Continue to Pre-order the Book

Oh my goodness- last night we reached our target and  we are absolutely thrilled that you have believed in our project. Early next week I will publish the full list of thank yous to all of those who pledged and believed in our project! So Thank you one and all. Big or small your pledge has  made our dream possible!

But  if you wanted to pledge and missed out you can still pledge until the 31 August- as this is the only way to preorder the book at the discount price. You can still do this through the Pozible platform.The book will not be available at the discount price after this date, and in the future I shall not be carrying too many books in my luggage as it will be a substantial book and my luggage is reserved for quilts and fabrics! Continued pledges would also be useful in helping pay for some of the in-kind services we mentioned in our previous blog post.

Also we can now say the book will be a definite goer !

So if you missed out it's still possible to pre-order the book and if you do we will add a small gift as well and  giftwrap your book. Or indeed you can still pledge for any of the other available Rewards. We were delighted that all the rewards for the hand made books were taken up. And yes we shall have our work cut out for us!

This weekend we are heading off to the Berry Patchwork and  Quilting Retreat  to show off all those wonderful stitched Sentinelles- yes they will see the world again!
and I shall be selling my  panels of the Chartres Queens, which is part of the Medieval project- which will premiere in france in April 2015 and Berry next year.


by Dijanne Cevaal (noreply@blogger.com) at August 28, 2014 09:06 AM

Cynthia St. Charles

Iris Printed Potholders

 Here are 8 of the potholders and hot pads I made for Iris Club bingo prizes.  I started out making them with black and white fabrics, but then I decided to use up some colorful scraps.  I think both ways look great.  Who doesn't need potholders?

by Cynthia St Charles (noreply@blogger.com) at August 28, 2014 06:00 AM

August 27, 2014

Dijanne Cevaal

4 Days to Go and 181 Supporters


Cocteau's cat looking heaven ward in the little chapel in Millie le Foret in France at the La chapelle Saint-Blaise-des-Simple

What a monster of a day yesterday turned out to be in our fundraising campaign and we are getting closer and closer to our target. First of all our heartfelt thanks to Carole Veillon of Quilt Mania not only for putting our quest on the front page of the Quilt Mania website but also  with a very generous gift to help us realise our dream. 

We also want to thank Emma Coutencier of Au Fil D'Emma on her blog for her translation into french of how Pozible operates as it is  relatively unknown platform in  France.

Thank you everyone for believing in us!


  But most incredibly we are 97% funded- which is just  so exciting for us and we hope for you as well! We still have a bit to go but hope it will  be reached by tonight!

Remember that  we have also used Pozible as a system for pre-ordering the book- at a 20% discount. We will not offer the book at that discount again so if you would like the book at $9.95 off order it through Pozible plus the postage and packaging within thebnext 4 days when the project finishes ( we will even nicely gift wrap it for you!)

by Dijanne Cevaal (noreply@blogger.com) at August 27, 2014 03:37 PM

Virginia A. Spiegel

Seven new artwork coming September 1

BW66Dtl500Boundary Waters 66 – Detail

I’ve been spending WAY to much time on the computer lately, but on September 1 you will have lots of new things to look at on my website.

To wit:

1.  A gallery of artwork called Shagbark based on my beloved hickories with one NEW artwork (handstitching! texture!) that occupied most of my winter:

SHAGBARK7webDtl1Shagbark 7 – Detail

2.  Six NEW Boundary Waters (#61 – 66) that have been simply, but completely, stitched to within an inch of their life:

BW65Detail500Boundary Water 65 – Detail

3.  A new gathering of artwork in a gallery called Diary of a Tree Hugger.  It’s artwork that’s been here and there, but will now be on its own page with a photo that’s sure to make you smile.

If you receive my free e-newsletter, you will be receiving links bright and early directly to all the NEW artwork on Monday, September 1 with a special bonus exclusively for readers. Otherwise I’ll be posting links here and, of course, you can always go directly to my website.

by Virginia at August 27, 2014 10:20 AM

Margaret Cooter

Elegance

My photo of Jeanne Lanvin's bedroom (designed by Albert-Armand Rateau, completed 1928 and now in the Musee des Arts Decoratifs in Paris) doesn't do it justice - fortunately there are more and better photos available online - and of the wonderful bathroom too.
The shade of cornflower blue is known as Lanvin Blue and is said to be inspired by the sky in a Fra Angelico fresco. The collaboration with Rateau for redesign of her apartment, homes, and business began in 1922.

Jeanne Lanvin (1867-1946) - a milliner who married an Italian nobleman - made beautiful dresses for her daughter and from this evolved a famous Paris fashion house - indeed, an empire. She was formally recognized as a couturiere in 1909, and became one of the most influential designers of the 1920s and 30s, using intricate trimmings, virtuoso embroidery, and beads in clear, light, floral colours.

She is also well known for the perfumes My Sin and Arpège, developed in 1925 and 1927 - Rateau designed the bottle for Arpège, which was designed for Lanvin's daughter and presented to her on her 30th birthday.
The illustration on the bottle is by Paul Iribe, rendered in 1907, of Jeanne and Marguerite.

by Margaret Cooter (noreply@blogger.com) at August 27, 2014 09:57 AM

Neki Rivera

from the inkshop


in nara on sanjo dori.















trying zen stitching
























this one's in process.  if  one stitches and pulls the cotton gauze reacts by separating the threads and creating lovely holes.inspiration  comes from deanna.





3 days to go until i close my artfire shop.


neki desu
Creative Commons License

by noreply@blogger.com (neki desu) at August 27, 2014 08:00 AM

Cynthia St. Charles

Iris Club Bingo Prizes - Hand Printed Potholders.

Big Sky Iris Club has monthly meetings and our September meeting is when we play "Iris Bingo".  Everyone brings prizes that are related to iris in some way.  This year, I decided to make some hand printed potholders for prizes.  I dug around in my scrap box to find some hand dyed fabrics on which to print the iris image with black ink.  Then, I colored it in with fabric markers.  I sewed some strips around the sides, in a "quilt as you go" style - everything was all layered when I started adding the strips - so the quilting was done as each strip was added.  Then, I did free motion quilting around the iris image, trimmed and bound.  I made 10 of these, and finished them up well in advance of the next meeting!    

by Cynthia St Charles (noreply@blogger.com) at August 27, 2014 06:00 AM

August 26, 2014

Rayna Gillman

mid-week update

The demolition derby arrived on Saturday to remove part of the ceiling and wall that were wet from the leaking ice machine.  (Tuesday)There is more, and they will be back tomorrow to measure the moisture levels, take out more sheet rock, and maybe remove the fans and dehumidifier that have been running for 
days.

  nice grid, huh?

Wednesday
I won't bore you with the unnecessary demolition of the closet ceiling because plumber A was wrong about his diagnosis of the problem.  Enter Plumber B, who found the source of the leak (long story).
I am hoping FedEx will deliver the parts for the icemaker tomorrow.  Meantime, the plumber advised me to get a leak alarm, which he says Home Depot carries.  That is tomorrow morning's trek.  

Meanwhle, at 11:00 last night, my beloved brother arrived from Pittsburgh with my SIL and nephew. Nephew Jonah had to sleep on the couch with the fans and dehumidifier going, but he managed to sleep through it all as only a teenager can.  They all took off for New York this morning.  I love my brother and only wish he lived close by instead of 7 hours away. Waaah. I never get to spend enough time with him. He fills my life with laughter when we are together.

In the midst of all this chaos I have been revising my website, which is a slow process because of a new host, new software, and minimal time to get it the way I want it.  And I'm frantically working on a couple of new pieces for my exhibit in Oct.  

With all this aggro, the only thing to do was to take a mid-afternoon margarita break on the deck to decompress and pretend I am on vacation.  I am tempted to stay out here and read for a while and get back to sewing tonight.

Ha, good idea,Rayna.

by noreply@blogger.com (Rayna) at August 26, 2014 07:11 PM

Margaret Cooter

Wet weekend

Monday's unrelenting rain put a bit of a damper on Notting Hill Carnival, but in Kensal Rise we could still hear some of the music rumbling in the distance throughout the day. And it was quite amusing to watch the traffic speeding through the lake that had formed outside -




The drain simply can't cope, even with less water. By morning it had shrunk somewhat -
Being trapped indoors made it imperative to do something "useful" - while dusting and hoovering the weekend studio I managed to throw out a few old, unneccesary, bothersome things - and found a few bits to salvage, including this, which only needed a few more borders to get it to journal quilt size -
which, now that it's 8"x8", doesn't quite work as a "High Horizons" quiltlet. Hmm, what to do with it next ... foiling? applique? hand stitch? Let's face it, some things end up looking like a bunch of scraps thrown together - this seems destined for the interior of a potholder!!

Perhaps this accumulation of scraps has more chance of success -
It's waiting for next weekend to be sewn together. Joining the scraps of wadding was a simple pleasure, and now there's enough for three more JQs. (Old towels and sweaters make good wadding for JQs too.)

Handstitching is a lovely thing to do on a wet weekend, listening to Radio 4 or catching up on the iplayer - I got on with this
which is mostly linen threads, the rows made either "over and over" or "back and forth" - each has a different feel during the stitching and then later when you run your hands over the piece. It was inspired by seeing the work of Gillian Lavery online - that brought on the itch to stitch, and it feels wonderful to be filling this cloth in this simple way, waiting to see what evolves from choices and accidents.

Also under the needle, a small double-sided piece - again to see what happens and what changes can be made to something prosaic -

by Margaret Cooter (noreply@blogger.com) at August 26, 2014 02:42 PM

Dijanne Cevaal

5 Days and 144 Supporters!

 We have 5 days to go in our Pozible campaign and we now have 144 supporters. Thank you all and one ( and you will be thanked on my blog if we reach our target ) for without you we would not be at the 66% mark. Thank you for believing in our project.

I have  been told that some people consider our target of $20,000 to be expensive for  self publishing a book. We did  put on our Pozible campaign page  what the money will be spent on  and  publishing in Australia would have been much more expensive ( though we have not closed that door quite as we would love to support a local business). In fact in most of our research of other campaigns for self publishing , the targets for self publishing full colour books at around the same number of pages but much smaller format, were at $30,000 plus ( and not signature stitched but glued).

So  part of our savings have been that design fees, colour photography fees and colour matching and typesetting are all in kind fees. If you don't typeset properly you end up with really ugly looking text- its an important lesson I learnt from one of my teachers when I did the  desktop publishing course and it is something my daughter Celeste- the  designer- is passionate about. It means  each word is hand kerned- which means you adjust the spacing between most letters in the chosen fonts because believe it or not not all fonts are beautiful just on their own, they are often tweaked to make your paragraphs look beautiful. We have translation fees of course and then there is all the work in ensuring good photos that are inspiring. We have also chosen to use a high quality paper because we would like the book to  be a quality object, and of course a hard cover  and signature stitched case bound, which means no glued pages to fall out or come loose and which adds to the strength of the book and last longer.

I hope this explains some of our costing in more detail- getting to all the nitty gritty has been a huge learning curve and we researched  about a dozen books we liked the look off, and went though every page critiqueing and noting what we liked and didn't like. We are really attempting to make an art house book that is a number of standards above the every day craft book whilst still acknowledging that many textile pople do want to know how to do things  which is why we are making the dvd.

Anyway number 150 supporter- if we reach our target we will have something special for you!
 You can see sample pages of the introduction at a preview we have set up on Issu

by Dijanne Cevaal (noreply@blogger.com) at August 26, 2014 12:22 PM

Olga Norris

Discovery and anticipation

Out to lunch 2007 (private collection)
Flying tonight 2009 (private collection)
Although I usually have no, or scant features on my faces in my work, being more interested in exploring the communications of body language, I am nonetheless fascinated by portraits in general.  Recently, while looking for something else (as is so frequently the way) I found the work of printmaker Ellen Heck,
 
(image from here - individual 'Fridas' can be found here)
also discovering at the same time that she has work in an upcoming exhibition at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London next year - news of which I have not been able to track down elsewhere.
Mary Cassatt: The bath
Ellen Heck's work immediately brought to mind Mary Cassatt's prints which I admire greatly.
The National Gallery of Art in Washington has several.
Mary Cassatt: The coiffure
Ellen Heck: The edition and the open window
Ellen Heck: The bath and the towel
Ellen Heck: The letterpress and the light
I am attracted to the breadth of Heck's work.  (Here and here are two more links to her work.)  Her work is not solely figurative: she has made some fascinating, mesmerising, inspiring colour wheels as can be seen in detail on her site, and also at the Wally Workman Gallery blog where I found this image:
In Ellen Heck's predominantly figurative work, like Cassatt she avoids sentimentality with her gentle humour, and there is that certain thoughtfulness - stillness - contemplation which I try to capture in my own work.  Best of all, however, I enjoy her examples of the printmaker at work as shown in the images above from her Place and Process series.  I find myself returning to her website every few days to savour the delights - and I look forward very much to the exhibition Facing History: Contemporary Portraits next year.

by Olga Norris (noreply@blogger.com) at August 26, 2014 12:00 PM

Margaret Cooter

On (in?) a sub

The Ocelot, a Cold War submarine - 90m long

Not easy to move around!

It would have been crowded - 60 or so men aboard

Equipped for surveillance duties

The periscope-thingy

...and what you see through it (Chatham Historic Dockyard)

Engine room - not as claustrophobic as I'd feared, but the 15-minute walkthrough was enough for me.

by Margaret Cooter (noreply@blogger.com) at August 26, 2014 09:29 AM

Neki Rivera

antidote-finished


the stitching noise  antidote is finished. another good news is that today is the first sunny day in weeks. the bad news is that it's hot. the good news is that i started warming the ai vat for  dyeing.
looking forward to some dyeing before september comes. you never really know with september it can be cool and rainy or very hot and dry.
on another note i decided to close my artfire storefront so do check it out before the end of the month when i'll take everything down. see if you like anything. hint,hint.


















neki desu
Creative Commons License 

by noreply@blogger.com (neki desu) at August 26, 2014 08:00 AM

Cynthia St. Charles

Dill Pickles!

 I don't try raising vegetables at my place on account of the deer - they will just eat everything up.  But my daughter, Elizabeth lives in town and has a nice little vegetable garden.  She has been saving up her cucumbers so I could make some dill pickles.  Grandson Airus loves dill pickles and my mother has a really terrific recipe for them.  I have not canned in years, but it seemed like a good thing to do on a rainy day in late August.  I made 13 quarts! 
I will get the recipe posted up on my food blog sometime soon and let you know when it is there.

by Cynthia St Charles (noreply@blogger.com) at August 26, 2014 06:00 AM

August 25, 2014

Terry Grant

Prep work

I am trying to finish some things up before we leave on our trip in a couple of weeks. This finish work is a little slow and boring, but produces a nice feeling of satisfaction when I have a group of work all ready for a show. These are the small pieces that I have been mounting on stretcher bars or framing. Today I finished the backsides with artists tape, a hanging wire and a label with my name, email address and information about the care of a textile work. I like a nice, neat back on my work.

These are the finished pieces.

I have also added most of these and a few others to my "small work" page with prices. You can access that page from the tabs just above this post.

Whew! Feels good to have that done.

 

by Terry Grant (noreply@blogger.com) at August 25, 2014 11:53 PM

Dijanne Cevaal

The Journey to Pozible-9 Days left to Pledge

 To say that this Pozible funding campaign has been a journey is an understatement- we go from high to low in a matter of hours but at the same time we are blown away by the fact that 102 people have so far believed in our project and the journey. So I feel I would like to share the journey  to some extent.

My eldest daughter, Celeste who is designing the book was almost at the beginning of the journey. She was just a toddler when I started my textile/quilting business. After initially learning the skills and taking to machine quilting like a duck to water- using the needle as my pen I found I could draw things I would never draw by hand. I was off and running. Two more daughters  came along and we moved to the Otways- we recycled a house rather than build a new house and we battled along in the pre internet days, teaching, creating and dyeing loads and loads of fabrics and even printing some.

The in 1997 one of my quilts won a kudos prize in France and so I started the dream to go to France with my young family. I corresponded with the  organiser madame Tison and so was hatched the plan to take 30 Art quilts made by different Australian artists  to be exhibited at Chateau de Chassy. As part of the event Madame Tison graciously allowed my young children and ex husband and myself to stay in the Chateau. This was a typical burgundian chateau that had definitely seen better days- but what an adventure- we lived in a castle for 3 months and the exhibition was a rip roaring success and ended up being seen in  a lot of European venues and the Australian Embassy in Paris- and so was born my curating career.

Between 2000-2010 I toured many exhibitions - all of them on crazy shoe string budgets and  always with a child in tow as I could use their luggage allowance to carry the quilts that always weighed in excess of baggage allowances that the airline companies allow in flights form Australia to Europe. We went to the Middle East, Egypt, Syria even Israel and the Palestinian Territory and meanwhile many events in Europe as well in many different countries. I worked hard at trying to put Australian and New Zealand art quilts on the world quilting stage- I was passionate in my belief that Antipodeans are extremely talented!

In 2010 I hung up my curating shoes- the economy was increasingly impacting on costs of travelling exhibitions and baggage allowances were a nightmare and my children were now at high school so they could no longer accompany me. (little did I realise those curating shoes would only stay in the cupboard a little time). I also decided it was time to focus on my own work- carrying around suitcases of other people's work meant there was little room for my own work.In 2007 I separated from my ex-husband, though still lived in the Otways.

2010 was also the year I spent  mostly living in France with my youngest daughter ( she didn't like it I loved it and will forever be grateful to  my friend Liwanag Sales and her  husband Michel Fromont) for allowing me to live at le Triadou at the foot of Pic St Loup. I came back with my youngest daughter needing to finish high school at a better school than Colac could offer us at that stage, and so we moved to Geelong. Olive tree linocut inspired by the landscape around Le Triadou.


During this time I still made trips to Europe but shorter ones and only once a year. I also joined Geelong Quilters, became president and convened their Bienniel exhibition last year. However after my year in France I really wanted to write/create something about the experience. I have always loved France but felt I wanted to create something more- after all the country had received me with open arms- so brewed the idea for this book. But I wanted it to be a beautiful book, something that was inspiring but also went some way to answering the question as to what inspires me- it is a really difficult question to answer on the spot!

And so we have come a full circle- my eldest daughter loves books as much as I do and is also studying  visual communication and design ( my other daughters are all incredibly talented as well) and so we decided we would embark on this journey together- to create this book Musing in Textile: France and  we ask you for your help in pledging for rewards which we have framed in such a way that  most rewards are pre-orders of the book with some extras thrown in. If we reach our target we feel this is the beginning of another journey- to bring more books in this vein to you our supporters!

So we are nearly at the half way mark of our fundraising efforts and there is  9 days left to Pledge for a reward- without you this book cannot happen- we hope that you will share in the dream and be inspired by it  as well!

The sample pages from the Introduction are about encounters in France- later chapters will have some of the work I have created as a result of the inspirations.


by Dijanne Cevaal (noreply@blogger.com) at August 25, 2014 12:07 PM

6 Days to Go for our Pozible Fund raiser

Oh my goodness it's so close and so far. We are at present 60% funded in our Pozible campaign or close to it but there is only 6 days to go for our fund raising efforts to self publish our book Musing in Textile: France. If we do not reach our funding target we will receive no funds and all our work will have just been hard work for nothing.

Yesterday made us believe again and we want to thank all 133 supporters for your  pledges and sharing of our  campaign- without you we would not be where we are- close so close . Somehow halfway was always such a landmark for us but when we reached it we thought oh no it means we have another 50% to go and not much time left.

We are surprised only one of the workshop rewards  has been pledged. I often get emailed  as to when I will be teaching in Sydney or Canberra- but unless the big groups invite you it is  difficult to organise so we really  costed the workshop reward to be good value for you and 7 friends plus you will get a book each as well ( and I have to travel to each place as well which is part of the whole package). In Melbourne you even get lunch :-)

The Book Reward is offering the book at a 20% discount to entice you to pre-order in effect- this will be the only time that the book is offered at a discount like this . Postage had to be included because it is difficult to travel with a mass of books that will weigh over 1 kg each.

We hope you will help us cross our Target line!

And some images of ice dyeing I did to make some fabric  on which to print the medieval tree linocut. If you pledge  for a Reward of $80 or more one of these prints will be yours as a special thank you gift from us. Top photo is the tray  of ice dyeing. On the left is linen fabric and on the right the normal cotton fabric I use.



by Dijanne Cevaal (noreply@blogger.com) at August 25, 2014 12:06 PM

Neki Rivera

in shape with the beatles


taking advantage of the cloudy cool weather-no ai- i've been learning how to shape garments with the k machine.geezz the problem comes when the instructions say now do thee same from left to right or right to left.for a mild dislexic it's hell on wheels. i also think i'm missing a line of instruction because the numbers don't work out. i figured if i'm going to knit a garment the instructions will be more specific then decided not to bother  flipping everything, including my brain,  and doing the other side. 
 time will tell.





















neki desu
Creative Commons License

by noreply@blogger.com (neki desu) at August 25, 2014 09:34 AM

Margaret Cooter

Monday miscellany

Natural dyes - and a great idea for storing shorter lengths of yarn
by Cozymemories on flickr

Coptic weaving (8th century or thereabouts) at British Museum

Machine(?) of the week - what is it? Seen at Victoria Station

Milk float, now used for general goods transport at Chatham Historic Dockyard

"The bright cloud" - reminds me of this one ...
... by Samuel Palmer (via)

by Margaret Cooter (noreply@blogger.com) at August 25, 2014 09:16 AM

Cynthia St. Charles

Rained Out!

 We have planned for months to do a 29 mile / 4 day backpacking trip as a family this past weekend (August 21 - 25).  The weather forecast was for snow and highs in the 40's for the Beartooth Mountains, where we planned to hike. 

We  made all the preparations, but we canceled our trip due to the weather.  This gave me some unexpected time at home - where we have received 3 inches of rain over the past couple of days.  Over the next few posts, I'll show you what I have been up to.....stuck in the house, but keeping occupied!



by Cynthia St Charles (noreply@blogger.com) at August 25, 2014 06:00 AM

August 24, 2014

Terry Grant

Sunday—

I'm experimenting today. I'm still fiddling with the new camera and now, this very moment I am trying out a new app (Blogsy) for writing my blog on my iPad. It seems much more full-featured than what I have been using. So far it has allowed me to link the word Blogsy to their web site. Couldn't do that with the old app. Now, if I can place a photo, center it and change its size I will be a happy iPad blogger.

Nice. I'm a fan.

 

 

by Terry Grant (noreply@blogger.com) at August 24, 2014 07:36 PM

Olga Norris

Curiosity?

The first stuffed animals I ever saw were birds which had been shot by an uncle.  The taxidermy had been done by a friend of his and the poor things were beginning to disintegrate in the Greek heat.  I hated what had been done to them - and them too, especially as they seemed to be staring at me as I lay down for my siesta every afternoon.
Then of course there were the stuffed specimens in museums.  (The ones above are part of Kelvingrove Museum's collection.)  Such animals, shown in their environment fascinated me, despite the moth-eaten aspects of many of them.  The nascent designer in me wanted to get fixing those dioramas!  But in this day of wondrous wildlife films do we need stuffed animals any more?
And then there is art - or is it?  These kittens-in-tableau are by Walter Potter, the picture from here.  But there is something perhaps much more serious here:
Klaus Pichler: from Skeletons in the Closet project.
I have just posted an article about taxidermy in art - with more links on Ragged Cloth Café.

by Olga Norris (noreply@blogger.com) at August 24, 2014 01:33 PM

Margaret Cooter

By the sea side - St Leonards

Road-runes
Window dressing  (with view of  English channel)
Shopping au plein aire - a tourist destination?
Last glimpse of the sea

by Margaret Cooter (noreply@blogger.com) at August 24, 2014 09:29 AM

Gerrie Congdon

Some Studio Time and an Art Date

syringewriting

I had a rude awakening this week and realized that I needed to get a project done for The Printed Fabric Bee. So I spent some time in my studio this week. It is cooler now so much easier to work there. I did a little syringe writing with black paint.

beeswaxcrayonwork

I also used one of my wood block designs to do some beeswax crayon rubbings. I will share more of this project later when it is finished and mailed to the Queen Bee.

It has been one of those crazy weeks. Monday and Tuesday were left brain, excel spread sheets, kind of days doing my membership work for SDA. Wednesday, I worked at Trinity helping to prepare food for the community outreach meal. I love doing this; it combines two of my favorite things, making food and hanging out with great people. Then, I got to spend some time in the studio for a couple of days.

Sidnee Snell, a local textile artist and SAQA member has an exhibit of her work at the Guardino Gallery in the Alberta area of N. Portland. Sidnee manipulates photos to create patterns to create her beautifully stitched pieces, using hand-dyes.

Sidnee

This piece is from a photo of a rusting bridge.

sidneerustedbridge

 

This one is called red laces:

2014-08-23 14.18.59

I love the richness of the colors that Sidnee uses and her machine quilting adds a wonderful dimension to the work.

I loved the two pieces she calls sacred seating which are church pews.

Sidneesacredseats

sidneeseatsandcarvings'

The other artist in the show makes wood sculptures with figures in evocative situations. They were very interesting and well done.

carvedwork

sidneeandmorecarving

After our gallery trip, we stopped at the mall and I did some binge shopping at Macy’s for some things for out upcoming trip to celebrate 50 years of wedded bliss.

 

by Gerrie at August 24, 2014 04:40 AM

August 23, 2014

Margaret Cooter

Preparing for Notting Hill Carnival

Is Notting Hill Carnival world famous? have you heard of it? It's the largest street festival in Europe and has been going since 1964. Music, food, parades, costumes, drink, crowds, traffic disruption - it's party party party, especially on the Sunday and Bank Holiday Monday. By 5pm on Saturday, preparations were well underway, largely consisting of property damage limitation (consider the amount of garbage from food and drink, for example) and crowd control measures. I usually keep well away (we're at least a mile away but can hear the music in Kensal Rise, and parking spaces are snapped up here and even further away from the main action).

So here's what I saw from the bus, travelling south to north.
Painted boarding in the posh bits - Notting Hill Kitchen

... and "Happy Carnival" wishes from Paul Smith

Some residents make sure they're away for the duration

Immediately the boards gather graffiti of varying standards

The lull before the storm

Fences and movable barriers are also in evidence

No "dental care" this weekend!

Already looking busier than usual, Ladbroke Grove station will be closed

Graffiti artists go to town

Police cones everywhere ... including side streets - no parking!!
The weather report isn't particularly good, but that's hardly likely to stop the crowds. Happy Carnival!

by Margaret Cooter (noreply@blogger.com) at August 23, 2014 08:46 PM

Terry Grant

Isn't technology grand?

And frustrating. 

I really do love all these new gizmos. I am totally dependent on my smartphone and find endless, endless pleasure in my iPad. And I remember, in the '60s, when my dad brought home a handheld calculator that could add, subtract, multiply and divide. He put his slide rule away and never looked back. We all viewed it as just short of a miracle. That was the beginning of wondrous things...

We just bought a new camera. We are traveling next month and wanted something small, but with more features than our phones. Lucky for us we know someone else in need of the same kind of camera and he had done all the research, which he gladly shared with us. It is a dandy little camera, with a 30x zoom. ( Just a few years ago I thought my 12x zoom was the bee's knees...)  and this camera has wifi. Imagine that! Wifi. I'm probably way behind, and you already know all this, but wifi means the camera will magically send my photos directly to my iPad or other devices and, just think how easy that makes blogging those photos. (!!!)

So, to try this all out, I wandered around and took photos today. I zoomed up high into the trees, and took shots from across the yard and zoomed into low growing flowers. Then I pulled out the manual to find out how to send them to the iPad. Here is where it got frustrating. I carefully followed each direction, camera in one hand, iPad in the other hand and manual in my other other hand— or something. Nothing happened. I took a deep breathe, started over and did it all again, step by step, by step. Nothing happened. I reread the manual, I read the "help" section on the iPad app, I rechecked all the settings on the camera, then on the iPad. I tried again. NO-THING! Now I am sweating and I start pushing buttons and trying anything and manage to freeze up the camera, which it seems can only be unfrozen by removing the battery and then putting it back in. I pace around a little bit, breathe deeply. I'm into my second hour of fiddly-fie-fiddling with this demon object!  I shake it out and begin again, direction 1, 2 ...  And voila! It works. I watch, in amazement, as my photos pop onto the screen of my iPad. Don't ask me how it worked that time. It just did. It was a miracle. Or magic. 

Here are my photos:








Now I need a glass of wine. 





by Terry Grant (noreply@blogger.com) at August 23, 2014 08:03 PM

Margaret Cooter

Subterranean splendour

White Rock Baths provided the citizens of Hastings and St Leonards with sea water swimming and private baths at the end of the 19th century; in the 1930s they were rejuvenated. With war and the postwar holiday slump business fell off and they were closed, but in the 1970s they were converted to an ice rink and a roller rink. Since 1997 they have been closed and left to moulder.

Photographer Brian Ryboult was granted access, and though his photographs - on show at Hastings Museum till 14 September - we can revisit this forgotten place.

Mosaics in what we think must have been the cold plunge pool

Skate hire storage
Once they were the largest covered swimming pool in Europe,
with luxurious facilities
Historical photos, and some of the sadder sights, are here.


by Margaret Cooter (noreply@blogger.com) at August 23, 2014 11:55 AM

Exhibition list

Some things to see in London - reminder to myself! (Most are free.)

Reason & Intuition: Alvar Aalto & Ola Kolehmainen in Soane at PM Gallery, Ealing - till 24 August

The Felt Cornershop, 19 Wellington Row, Bethnal Green - till 31 August (video is here)

Fine Prints & Maps at Henry Sotheran Ltd - till 8 September
Pelletted plastic rubbish (via)
The Rubbish Collection at the Science Museum - till 14 September



Paper Cut at The Proud Archivist - till 25 September

Primrose: Early Colour Photography in Russia at The Photographers’ Gallery - till 19 October

Virginia Woolf at National Portrait Gallery till 26 October (£7)

Joan Fontecuberta at the Science Museum - till 9 November (entry fee)

Rapid Response Collecting  at V&A until 15 January 2015

Disobedient Objects at V&A till 1 February

Truth and Memory, art of WW1, till 8 March 2015 at the newly reopened Imperial War Museum
Ceiling of books by Richard Wentworth at Leadenhall Market (via)
Sculpture in the City - till May 2015, but why wait till then?

The art and science of exploration at The Queen’s House in Greenwich - ongoing

by Margaret Cooter (noreply@blogger.com) at August 23, 2014 11:23 AM

Little houses at Hastings Museum



 The models include a battered one of this large building, in India -
which is connected to the Brasseys, a prominent local family, who donated an amazing room, the Durbar Hall, to the museum -
It had been installed at the back of their London home (24 Park Lane) as a smoking room that contained Lady Brassey's ethnographic collection. A special extension to the Hastings museum was eventually built to accommodate it.

by Margaret Cooter (noreply@blogger.com) at August 23, 2014 09:45 AM

Cynthia St. Charles

Family Reunion Group at Georgetown Lake

We had 33 people attending - all related by blood or marriage to my parents who are in the front row on the left.  They are in their mid 80's and in good vigorous health.  We know we are really lucky to be able to gather this way and have everyone there!

by Cynthia St Charles (noreply@blogger.com) at August 23, 2014 06:00 AM

August 22, 2014

Rayna Gillman

Happy Friday

This is the pinky on my left hand.  It has four stitches in it and you do not want to know the gory details.  Suffice it to say that I am glad my neighbor was home and could put multiple bandaids on my finger.  Unfortunately, it was not enough.

I was hoping not to have to go to the urgent care place a few blocks away because I was expecting the service person to fix my leaking ice machine to arrive between 1 and 4 this afternoon and it was already after 1:00.  Alas, I had to go.  The good news is that my neighbor was able to let in the service guy, who then called me on my cell while I was waiting for the stitches.  By the time all was well and I got home, the service guy was long gone but I could not get into my driveway because the roofing people had parked in front of my driveway, blocking it.  Don't even ask about that.

My neighbor told me that the GE guy ordered 2 parts and will be back next Friday, but that he heard gurgling in the drain and I needed to call a plumber to check that out.  oh, joy.  THEN she said that my carpet in the basement was soaked, so down I went.  Indeed!
A little spot of water damage to the ceiling but the whole carpet wet.  Called the insurance company. I need the mold prevention guys with fans here.  Am waiting for a call from the adjuster. The plumber can wait till Monday, when my brother from Pittsburgh and his brood arrive to stay.  Uh - the downstairs guest room is soaked. Sigh...

Can't wait to see what the rest of the almost-over day brings.  I had planned to spend today working at home. So much for THAT!

I am left dominant, although there are some things I cannot do with my left and can only do with my right hand.  Using knife and scissors are the top two.  I also drink/dial the phone (or whatever you call it these days) and iron.  Go figure.  I am a crackerjack typist, at least 80 wpm -- but today, I am typing using my left index finger instead of my pinky, so there might be typos.  

Maybe I should order takeout tonight.  I was going to cook, but not while my finger is in pain and I can't get it wet.    I don't have anything I can even microwave -- so I might as well call Athena's Greek Kitchen and relax.

RELAX?? What is that?  I was planning to spend the day in the dye studio tomorrow - uh - nope. never a dull moment. I think I will read tonight and let the chips fall where they may, which they will do, anyway.


by noreply@blogger.com (Rayna) at August 22, 2014 08:10 PM

Margaret Cooter

New caf on the block

At one corner of the Arts Building(!) in the big John Jones redevelopment is, newly opened, a bakery/cafe -
Through the windows, in the photo, you can just about see the teeny-tiny minicab office across the street, and the rail yard beyond that - very scenic... Not to forget the Hair Port salon, just out of view...

This pic, presumably of the High St Ken cafe, from their website shows that trendy-area prices are seeping along to up-and-coming Finsbury Park - £3 for a capuccino, £2.25 for tea. Ouch!
This area could definitely do with some more places to buy good bread. I'm a big fan of the 5-cereal loaves from the organic shop, but don't happen to be passing by it all that often. Whereas this cafe is open early and late, and requires only a slight swerve on the way home from the tube station.

Outside the swish new building, reality kicks in -
The teeny-tiny minicab office, with rail yard behind

"Hair Port" and the hand car wash, with Finsbury Park underground behind

by Margaret Cooter (noreply@blogger.com) at August 22, 2014 09:07 AM

Cynthia St. Charles

Home Made Ice Cream


When we were growing up, we had a milk cow and thus an abundance of cream.  It was a summer tradition to make ice cream with the hand crank.  Most of the grandkids and great grandkids had no experience with home made ice cream, so my mother  brought her old hand crank and all the supplies.  It made for a fun afternoon activity.  And a delicious treat that evening!

by Cynthia St Charles (noreply@blogger.com) at August 22, 2014 06:00 AM

August 21, 2014

Olga Norris

The edge of chill

Definite change in the weather - and the morning sun is lower in the sky: the view out to the garden at breakfast is distinctly approaching Autumn.  The holly is full of green berries, and the hawthorns' berries are reddening quickly.  The hazel on the way to the post office has lost all its nuts to the squirrels who can be seen from time to time running along the electricity wire with something suspiciously nut-like in their mouth.  Soup will be warm now.
Catch the fall: working design for linocut

by Olga Norris (noreply@blogger.com) at August 21, 2014 05:29 PM

Dijanne Cevaal

10 Days to Go

My goodness last night was lively in the fundraising effort to self publish on Pozible and we thank each and everyone of you that pledged. It gives us hope again and we are now at 40% funded. However we recognise there is still a long way to go so please share our link widely in your  social networks!

Also we are going to offer the pledger that brings us over the $10,000 ( the half funded mark) something special which we will let you know about tomorrow.

Further those who pledge for the workshops will have a choice in which workshop  which you will do- it will be entirely your choice!

We have been working hard on creating a sample chapter- please bear in mind that the translation is in its beginning stages as we do not want someone to spend all that time and effort if we don't reach our funding target on Pozible.

by Dijanne Cevaal (noreply@blogger.com) at August 21, 2014 12:47 PM

Margaret Cooter

Poetry Thursday - The Raven by Edgar Allan Poe

Portrait (and raven) by Schin Loong (available on Etsy)
The 108-line poem starts as it means to go on, rhythmic and alliterative, with many internal rhymes -

Once upon a midnight dreary, while I pondered, weak and weary,
Over many a quaint and curious volume of forgotten lore,
While I nodded, nearly napping, suddenly there came a tapping,
As of some one gently rapping, rapping at my chamber door.
''Tis some visitor,' I muttered, 'tapping at my chamber door-
Only this, and nothing more.'

The famous "Nevermore" appears in the 9th verse, after the bird is sitting comfortably on a bust of Pallas [goddess of wisdom] that is positioned over the chamber door -

Then this ebony bird beguiling my sad fancy into smiling,
By the grave and stern decorum of the countenance it wore.
'Though thy crest be shorn and shaven, thou,' I said, 'art sure no craven,
Ghastly grim and ancient raven wandering from the Nightly shore-
Tell me what thy lordly name is on the Night's Plutonian shore!'
Quoth the Raven, 'Nevermore.'

The next nine verses end in "Nevermore", until the poem ends -

And the Raven, never flitting, still is sitting, still is sitting
On the pallid bust of Pallas just above my chamber door;
And his eyes have all the seeming of a demon's that is dreaming,
And the lamplight o'er him streaming throws his shadow on the floor;
And my soul from out that shadow that lies floating on the floor
Shall be lifted- nevermore! 

Read the entire "Raven" here. It's brought "to chilling life" in this video (though you have to suffer a 30-second advert first). The setting is greatly inspired by German expressionist cinema; the video is about 11 minutes long. Or, have it read to you: in this video, the reader isChristopher Lee - it's all about the listening; the words on screen are a distraction.

The poem is set in context, and dissected, here - and elsewhere. Manet and Gustave Dore are among its illustrators, during its long life - it was first published in 1845.


As for Poe (1809-1849), writer of mystery and horror ... he "was one of the earliest American practitioners of the short story, and is generally considered the inventor of the detective fiction genre. He is further credited with contributing to the emerging genre of science fiction. He was the first well-known American writer to try to earn a living through writing alone, resulting in a financially difficult life and career." That comes from Wikipedia, where you can pick up the rest of the story of his life. "The cause of his death is unknown and has been variously attributed to alcohol, brain congestion, cholera, drugs, heart disease, rabies, suicide, tuberculosis, and other agents."

The "Allan" in his name was not given to him at birth, but by the family in Richmond, Virginia, who fostered him after his father skedaddled in 1810 and his mother died a year later of tuberculosis.

by Margaret Cooter (noreply@blogger.com) at August 21, 2014 09:34 AM

Neki Rivera

noise


living in the city is great. there is access to shops,hospitals many cultural activities and other amenities. i can turn down the stove, run down to get that missing ingredient and be back in 5 minutes; that's convenience. there is also a sense of neighborhood that i like. BUT:
summer means renovations and there is always one, if we're lucky, going on.this is not japan where neighbors are visited to announce the works thanked for their patience and in good will spirit presented with small gifts. here you wake up one morning at 8 to the sound of a sledge hammer. husband -san finds it normal because people take advantage of their going away on holidays to do the works, that's the way it's been done; this kills me. sure they go away and come back to a redone place. no inconveniences for them all for the neighbors. i think inconveniences should be shared.

this week has been dramatic after we thought the other works had finished 2 weeks ago and peace had finally settled in.
there's a lot of stitching going on because work has to be relaxing, soothing frayed nerves. in the hopes that the workers start painting next week yours truly is stitching away. the one above is still in progress. printed, painted and distressed lutradur, still dealing with the pink OD.




neki desu
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by noreply@blogger.com (neki desu) at August 21, 2014 08:16 AM