Planet Textile Threads

September 23, 2014

Margaret Cooter

Tube life

He got off at Baker Street, half lifting, half dragging the beanbag

They got off at Camden ... she had strings of pearls looped in her hair

by Margaret Cooter (noreply@blogger.com) at September 23, 2014 09:26 AM

Cynthia St. Charles

Scraps of Red

Weather is starting to cool off quite a bit and we are home more.  This is the time of year that I find difficult - shifting from outdoor play to indoor studio time.  I am finding this time with scraps is productive and inspiring.  I sorted out all the warm colored fabric scraps and will see what happens with them.....

by Cynthia St Charles (noreply@blogger.com) at September 23, 2014 06:00 AM

September 22, 2014

Olga Norris

Something new

I very much enjoy the process of learning, of following my curiosity, and uncovering new questions to ask.  My previous career in publishing gave me constant opportunities to pursue such activity, but now for some time I have been relying on my reading - mostly, though not exclusively of art books.  I do miss that more general input, and so I decided to try an online course.
I heard about FutureLearn courses on the radio during a programme which was describing a collaboration between the BBC and FutureLearn.  I was not particularly interested in that particular course, but the idea of such courses intrigued me.  So I have signed up for courses on archaeology: the first, on Hadrian's Wall begins today.  The courses are free, and there is no pressure on how much or how little the participant does - that suits me fine.
Image above from here, where you can see more photos of the wall
I have also signed up for three other archaeology courses, all under water.  I shall see how I progress through the first course before I get too enthusiastic.
This does not mean that I am giving up the stitching nor the printing - I am simply exploring more divers inputs.

by Olga Norris (noreply@blogger.com) at September 22, 2014 04:06 PM

Natalya Aikens

rapturous moment

I've been hearing about this exhibit for a while from friends, I've followed the artist on Instagram and yet I barely made it to the Hudson River Museum to see it before it closed. The odds were against me the whole way, calendar too full... and yet I'm am so glad that at the last moment I was able to put something aside and make it there.

"Much of what I am after in my work is to capture a rapturous moment, when a river of our inner life spills out of us like blood or milk."~ Mandy Greer

Needless to say I was captivated, enthralled, amazed and inspired. Here are a few shots that don't do this fantastical installation justice:
gorgeous cream colored birds flowing out of an upside-down crochet volcano
from the top looking into the volcano
Looking through the blue crocheted waterfall that draped over a staircase
more fantastical birds (wonderfully made!) floating above a volcano representing blood
which spills out in a quilted compass...
there were many many birds throughout this exhibit, all breathtaking. this one looking into a fractured mirror
and this bird on a gilded branch...
From the museum press release: "The sewing machine and the crochet hook are her tools. Fabric and objects from the natural world her medium." This artist speaks my language...I may have to learn to crochet.....and perhaps we could collaborate, I'll contribute the recycled plastic artwork. Can you tell that I am inspired?

by Natalya Aikens (noreply@blogger.com) at September 22, 2014 02:45 PM

Sarah Ann Smith

England 2014: the first Tuesday, London

Back in 1989-91, Paul and I lived in Libreville, Gabon, where he was the deputy US Ambassador and, since I wasn’t allowed to work under him according the State Department rules, I was on leave without pay (which was fine by me).  Our nearest neighbors and dear friends were the British Ambassador and his wife, Mark and Lynn Goodfellow.  Mark passed away years ago, but we keep in touch with Lynn.  We were to meet her on Tuesday afternoon, so in the morning Eli and I did the hop-on, hop-off tour of London (which took HOURS), then met Lynn for the afternoon and evening.  It was if 23 years evaporated–such fun!

With Lynn and Eli at Lynn's home in Putney Heath, near WImbledon, after a lovely day

With Lynn and Eli at Lynn’s home in Putney Heath, near WImbledon, after a lovely day

And I apologize in advance for so many photos, but gosh, this is maybe five percent (or less) of the photos that I took–things to remember and design inspiration EVERYWHERE!

Some of the things I noticed:  how CLEAN the air is compared to 30 years ago.  Gone are the diesel-spewing lorries and busses.  The vehicles have much stricter emissions, many are hybrids, and the air is actually CLEAN!  No more coughing on choking exhaust.  And the building–there were huge construction cranes and building and upgrading going on EVERYwhere.   Alas, I had told Eli to expect people to queue up nicely, no pushing, to wait for lights and so on.  At least in London that is no longer the case–it’s more like a big city anywhere.  And the dress:  in 1978, Americans looked American, Brits looked British, the Germans German and so on.  Now, MAYBE some of the French flair will pop out at you, but otherwise  from Japanese to American to British to generic European we all dress alike.  Except for the Muslim women in veils, but even there is a wide range!

Imagine, design inspiration even on the double decker buses.  Loved this take on steampunk!

Imagine, design inspiration even on the double decker buses, here on Regent Street in the heart of London. Loved this take on steampunk!

This beautiful building reinforced the dictum to "Look Up."

This beautiful building reinforced the dictum to “Look Up.”

Look at that cool critter up on top and the ornamentation in the base.

Look at that cool critter up on top and the ornamentation in the base.

I wish I had thought to switch the camera over to video, here on Regent Street at Oxford Circus.  A "Circus" is a roundabout or traffic circle.  This was about 10 am on a Tuesday  morning.  Talk about a swarm of humanity...it made me laugh, and really glad I was on the bus and not IN the swarm!

I wish I had thought to switch the camera over to video, here on Regent Street at Oxford Circus. A “Circus” is a roundabout or traffic circle. This was about 10 am on a Tuesday morning. Talk about a swarm of humanity…it made me laugh, and really glad I was on the bus and not IN the swarm!

SWOON--that half-timbered building is Liberty, as in Liberty of London, as in all that glorious fabric and more.   We did get back there but only for half an hour.  Just as well, if I had stayed longer I would be even more broke and have needed a suitcase!

SWOON–that half-timbered building is Liberty, as in Liberty of London, as in all that glorious fabric and more. We did get back there but only for half an hour. Just as well, if I had stayed longer I would be even more broke and have needed a suitcase!

Coming up on Picadilly Circus, traveling on Regent Street.  Notice the done on the building on the corner.

Coming up on Picadilly Circus, traveling on Regent Street. Notice the done on the building on the corner.

Look at that utterly amazing sculpture up near the dome, a woman diving...way cool!

Look at that utterly amazing sculpture up near the dome, a woman diving…way cool!

So much of the old architecture is laden with inspiring ornament, but even new buildings proved interesting.  Think how dull this modern building would be without that design up the front.  Hmmm...that could get translated into a really cool thermofax screen now that I think of it....

So much of the old architecture is laden with inspiring ornament, but even new buildings proved interesting. Think how dull this modern building would be without that design up the front. Hmmm…that could get translated into a really cool thermofax screen now that I think of it….

Soon we came to Trafalgar Square, with the National Gallery, St. Martin in the Fields church, Lord Nelson's column, and this blue rooster.   This plinth (base) has been the home for some rotating art.   I'll let you google to find out more about it... but a big blue....ummm...let's go with rooster.....someone has a sense of humor!

Soon we came to Trafalgar Square, with the National Gallery, St. Martin in the Fields church, Lord Nelson’s column, and this blue rooster. This plinth (base) has been the home for some rotating art. I’ll let you google to find out more about it… but a big blue….ummm…let’s go with rooster…..someone has a sense of humor!

National Gallery on the left....

National Gallery on the left….

And take a look at the design work on that dome.  What a great quilting pattern or background design!

And take a look at the design work on that dome. What a great quilting pattern or background design!

Next we went into the City of London, the original small city.  This clock is at the Inns of Court, the justice departments.

Next we went into the City of London, the original small city. This clock is at the Inns of Court, the justice departments.

Here's the fairy-tale-like building to which the clock is attached:.

Here’s the fairy-tale-like building to which the clock is attached:.

Next we drove along Fleet Street, home to the London press.  LOVED the dragon!

Next we drove along Fleet Street, home to the London press. LOVED the dragon!

And for my friend Jacquie who loves owls, this clock on a building on Fleet Street.

And for my friend Jacquie who loves owls, this clock on a building on Fleet Street.

One of the old narrow b uildings next to the raised light rail lines--if you look up a bit, you'll see the trains.  I used to take the train in from Lewisham when I was in school in the 70s.

One of the old narrow b uildings next to the raised light rail lines–if you look up a bit, you’ll see the trains. I used to take the train in from Lewisham when I was in school in the 70s.

The old and the new:  the Tower of London (another place we regretfully decided to skip because it was wall-to-wall people), with the modern building called the Gherkin behind it.

The old and the new: the Tower of London (another place we regretfully decided to skip because it was wall-to-wall people), with the modern building called the Gherkin behind it.

Going across Tower Bridge.  The Bridge is a stunning architectural beauty!

Going across Tower Bridge. The Bridge is a stunning architectural beauty!

A neighborhood (Belgravia or Chelsea I think) in London

A neighborhood (Belgravia or Chelsea I think) in London

A most stunning artwork-in-progress at The Tower to commemorate those slain in World War 1, as this is the centennary anniversary of the start of that war.   Learn more about this Fields of Blood installation here.

A most stunning artwork-in-progress at The Tower to commemorate those slain in World War 1, as this is the centennary anniversary of the start of that war. Learn more about this Sea of Red  installation here and here.  Red poppies, which grew in Flanders Fields, are traditional in the UK to commemorate those lost in war.  These are ceramic poppies; the last will be installed on November 11th, 2014, armistice day (the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month, our Veterans’ Day).  The Smithsonian article (the second link) said “All told, 888,246 poppies will flood the Tower’s moat, equaling the number of British and Colonial soldiers who perished in the war.  The project, titled Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red, comes from the creative minds of ceramic artist Paul Cummins and state designer Tom Piper.”

At 1 pm, we met Lynn at Westminster Pier.  She said she'd have on a hat.  Well, as we walked up I saw a woman in a hat with her back to me in a stance that looked SO familiar, so I called out and indeed it was Lynn!  We went on a cruise ship up the Thames from Westminster (home to Parliament, Big Ben and Westminster Abbey) to The Tower and back.  It was tons of fun!

At 1 pm, we met Lynn at Westminster Pier. She said she’d have on a hat. Well, as we walked up I saw a woman in a hat with her back to me in a stance that looked SO familiar, so I called out and indeed it was Lynn! We went on a cruise ship up the Thames from Westminster (home to Parliament, Big Ben and Westminster Abbey) to The Tower and back. It was tons of fun!  Lynn on the left, Eli wishing I would stop taking pictures with him in them.

I also  had a lot of f un taking pictures of chimney pots everywhere.

I also had a lot of f un taking pictures of chimney pots everywhere.

The Golden Hind, a replica of Sir Francis Drake's ship.  Depending on which side of the sword you were on, he was either a hero of Britain or a miserable marauding pirate.  He explored the San Francisco bay area and the main artery near where I grew up is called Sir Francis Drake Boulevard, and the public high school is Drake High School.

The Golden Hind, a replica of Sir Francis Drake’s ship. Depending on which side of the sword you were on, he was either a hero of Britain or a miserable marauding pirate. He explored the San Francisco bay area and the main artery near where I grew up is called Sir Francis Drake Boulevard, and the public high school is Drake High School.

American theatre impresario Sam Wannamaker is a hero in England for his successful efforts to reconstruct Shakespeare's Globe Theatre, complete with thatched mossy roof, on the banks of the Thames.  We didn't get to any plays...maybe next trip?

American theatre impresario Sam Wannamaker is a hero in England for his successful efforts to reconstruct Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre, complete with thatched mossy roof, on the banks of the Thames. We didn’t get to any plays…maybe next trip?

London Bridge is not falling down, and is still in place.  It is also NOT the beautiful Tower Bridge, but this rather bland thing.   At least I can now say I've been under, over and ON the Thames.

London Bridge is not falling down, and is still in place. It is also NOT the beautiful Tower Bridge, but this rather bland thing. At least I can now say I’ve been under, over and ON the Thames.

Eli recognized this building immediately as having been the location for MI6, the spy agency, in the last Bond movie, Skyfall.  Luckily, it did not really blow up, as it is the new Charing Cross Station (rail and tube).  The boat guide told us there was a design competition with the goal to design a building that has train-like...I can see the hint of the old engines in this--can you?

Eli recognized this building immediately as having been the location for MI6, the spy agency, in the last Bond movie, Skyfall. Luckily, it did not really blow up, as it is the new Charing Cross Station (rail and tube). The boat guide told us there was a design competition with the goal to design a building that has train-like…I can see the hint of the old engines in this–can you?

And our next day, the first Wednesday, was a day to remember for a lifetime….stay tuned!  I’ll blog about it in two parts…..

by Sarah Ann Smith at September 22, 2014 11:02 AM

Terry Grant

The Alhambra

In Granada, this was the nighttime view from our window of the Alhambra, the ancient Islamic fortress just up the hill from us. I had ordered the tickets for our visit before we left home. There would be no chance we would miss seeing this.

The Alhambra was built sometime in the 14th century by the Moorish (Muslim) rulers of that part of Spain, as a fortified palace. The Moors were driven from Spain in 1492 and the Alhambra became a palace for the Spanish royalty. It was here that Columbus made his pitch to Ferdinand and Isabela, for his plan to find a new route to India. Today it is a well-preserved World Heritage Site.

It is one of the most beautiful places I have ever been. A real paradise. I won't give you a lot of description or history. The Alhambra is best experienced visually, and truly photos don't begin to tell the story. Just know this is but a small sample of architecture, details of floors, archways, tile, carving, walls, fountains, gardens...

 

Even surrounded, as we were, by hoards of visitors, the beauty, the sense of peace and the aura of history are quite overwhelming. It was a very special day.

 

by Terry Grant (noreply@blogger.com) at September 22, 2014 11:03 AM

Neki Rivera

the end of hesitation





remember this fabric? it has been shuffled around for more than a year waiting for my weight to stabilize so i could fit into its narrowness;waiting to find a pattern that also fit into its narrowness and did not waste too much of the precious fabric. waiting and hesitating. 



yesterday i finally put and end to hesitation 101 as i found i could fit into this pattern and it in turn could be cut with minimal waste.












i am going to bore myself doing french seams because the fabric is light and the seams need special attention. either french seams or binding and guess what?

talking about boring i received a requirement from the bank that i needed to complete a w-9 form :(
being from puerto rico i've never had a tax number bcse we don't pay the feds. so it seems i need to go to the consulate and get whatever or a pat on the head or who knows what the situation is now.
this week promises to be enveloped by domestic bs. geezzz.




neki desu
Creative Commons License 

by noreply@blogger.com (neki desu) at September 22, 2014 08:51 AM

Cynthia St. Charles

Gnophaela Vermiculata on Timberline Lake Trail


I had difficulty identifying this butterfly we have seen often in the Beartooth Mountains, so I submitted my picture for professional evaluation to www.butterfliesandmoths.org.  I received an answer that this is, in fact, a moth.  Here is the info below:

http://www.butterfliesandmoths.org/species/Gnophaela-vermiculata

by Cynthia St Charles (noreply@blogger.com) at September 22, 2014 06:00 AM

Gerrie Congdon

Falling Leaves

falllingleaves

In my quest to re-energize my creative life, I decided to start by rehabilitating a couple of quilts that didn’t make the cut.

seamripperleaves

I made Taking Leaf of My Seasons for the SAQA Oregon Layers show and it did not get in. I was not surprised.

takingleafpreview

There were too many leaves, and they were too realistic for the abstract background. It was one of those last minute things and I didn’t have time to redo it for the show. So I am now removing them. It is really quite relazing and cathartic. Then, I have to figure out what to do. I really love the painted organza background so I want to do something that will work with it. Maybe fewer organza leaves that are fused or maybe thermofax prints. To be decided.

At any rate, I am still feeling under the weather and I have my two teen-age grandchildren here for a few days while Mom and Dad are in Portland, Maine. They are such great kids – so quiet and polite. We took them to the Farmer’s Market yesterday. Here they are walking back – notice the baguette of French Bread that Mia asked me to buy. It did not last long.

m&m9-14

Tomorrow will be a test for Mr C and I. We have to roust Mia at 6 am – get her breakfast, make lunch and walk her to the street car by 7 am. Her highschool is right on the streetcar line. Then, we have to get Miles moving and drive him back across the river to his neighborhood school by 8:45.  Wish us luck!!

 

 

by Gerrie at September 22, 2014 04:21 AM

September 21, 2014

Margaret Cooter

Blast from the past - cafe art

Drawings on cafe receipts, made between 2010 and 2012, which turned up recently. The dancing girls are from a book project round about the turn of the century.

Both activities - scribbing on receipts, and cutting out joined-up people, are very pleasurable, though drawing in public is less "remarkable" than cutting out paper dolls would be!

by Margaret Cooter (noreply@blogger.com) at September 21, 2014 09:34 AM

September 20, 2014

Sabrina Zarco

Website, book cover, and a new community oh my!

Finally the website is live and I am adding new work often. Please take a minute to check it out and share with others. I also welcome any suggestions or ideas of what to add.
http://www.sabrinazarco.com

 It is beloved community that make things move forward. This adventure continues and I am honored by those who have crossed my path. I am happy to announce that my artwork on Bayard Rustin (pictured below) will be the cover of a new book by Dr. Nicole Hirschfelder in Germany. Published by Universitaetsverlad Winter Heidelberg and will be available in hardcover and ebook this winter. Thank you Nicole for selecting my work now in the collection of Mandy Carter. We look forward to seeing the publication soon.




I am also feeling thankful for finding the most amazing, eclectic, creative, intelligent, diverse, interesting, and fun women in New Mexico. I have been welcomed into their community and I am thankful to begin this new journey with all of you. I look forward to sharing and learning as we exchange experiences and creative energy. 

Having a community is so important, and one that accepts all of who you are is even more essential for the spirit. I spend a lot of time alone and in studio and I am thankful for that time.  However community feeds the spirit in ways nothing else can do. Seek out community that accepts and respects you, all of you. Its good medicine.

by Sabrina (noreply@blogger.com) at September 20, 2014 08:18 PM

Sarah Ann Smith

Bloghop — Inside-Out in Quilting Arts Gifts 2014!

These are some of the bags you'll see on my Inside-Out bag segment (and ... hint hint... perhaps in print sometime soon too....more on that when I am allowed!)

These are some of the bags you’ll see on my Inside-Out bag segment.  The orange bags are one of my two projects in Quilting Arts Gifts 2014 along with a companion card holder.  The one on the right (the lotus fabric) is made from plasticized cloth, so great for make-up or messy stuff.

What fun I had on the set of Quilting Arts TV filming my episodes, and what MORE fun to have two projects included in this year’s Gifts 2014 magazine as well as two holiday recipes–one for a sweet treat the other is satsuma-currant scones (satsumas are similar to clementines or mandarins, use whatever citrus you have!).  Makes me hungry just thinking about them!

This year's issue of Quilting Arts Gifts.  I'm thrilled to have two projects and two recipes included!

This year’s issue of Quilting Arts Gifts. I’m thrilled to have two projects and two recipes included!

(Note:  to order, click here or use the Affiliate link in the sidebar on the left; the Affiliate link will get you a discount on some items!)

I thought I’d share some variations on the theme to give you ideas of how you can make your own bags–they are SO fast and easy and fun!  Use the article in Quilting Arts Holiday or the instructions in episode 1402  of Quilting Arts TV to make the bag with these variations.  Learn more about all of series 1400 here  including information about Episode 1402 which includes the bag project.

Here are two of my cardholders.  These are so fast--they would make a great gift-card "wrapping" for Christmas, then the recipient can continue to use the holder.  They are sized to fit business cards, but I use the green one for all those extra (annoying!) store cards for the grocery, discount stores, pharmacy, and so on.  The green was the original; despite being beaded on the flap and used heavily for three years, it is still in great condition.  The warm-tones bag is new.  The project in the magazine uses a snap closure, but I really like this one which uses a heavy duty hair elastic and button.

Here are two of my cardholders. These are so fast–they would make a great gift-card “wrapping” for Christmas, then the recipient can continue to use the holder. They are sized to fit business cards, but I use the green one for all those extra (annoying!) store cards for the grocery, discount stores, pharmacy, and so on. The green was the original; despite being beaded on the flap and used heavily for three years, it is still in great condition. The warm-tones bag is new. The project in the magazine uses a snap closure, but I really like this one which uses a heavy duty hair elastic and button.

The blue-green card holder has velcro closing.  I painted white velcro with acrylic ink to match.  The warm-tones uses that thick hair elastic.  I like the way I used perle cotton to quilt the bag and stitch down the back end of the hair elastic.

The blue-green card holder has velcro closing. I painted white velcro with acrylic ink to match. The warm-tones uses that thick hair elastic. I like the way I used perle cotton to quilt the bag and stitch down the back end of the hair elastic.

I’ve also made variations on the basic flat-bottomed bag for my iPad and notebooks.

The iPad case is simply a larger version of the card holder.  The trim comes from Renaissance Ribbons.

The iPad case is simply a larger version of the card holder. The trim comes from Renaissance Ribbons.

And the inside:

And the inside.  Again, I used acrylic inks to color the white velcro to match.

And the inside. Again, I used acrylic inks to color the white velcro to match.  I’m not sure that the ink is washfast, but so far I haven’t had to find out the hard way!  This bag has an outside pocket (with zipper) on the back to hold the charging stuff and stylus.

I made this bag to fit my new, slightly longer, portable watercolor palette and painting supplies.

I made this bag to fit my new, slightly longer, portable watercolor palette and painting supplies.

Inside of my Painting stuff bag.  It has pockets sized to fit a tube of gouache, a glue stick, eraser, and so on.

Inside of my Painting stuff bag. It has pockets sized to fit a tube of gouache, a glue stick, eraser, and so on.

I’ve also made several notebook or sketchbook covers using this easy technique.

My notebook, zipped closed.  Can you tell I really love that ribbon from Renaissance Ribbons?

My notebook, zipped closed. Can you tell I really love that ribbon from Renaissance Ribbons?  I also couched some heavy perle cotton on the edge and used it as a zipper pull.

 

The notebook cover opened up.  I make pencil pockets on the left and used a 22-24 inch zipper all the way around.   When gauging the size for your cover, think about the thickness of the zipper tape.  If your notebook is really thick, you may want to add some fabric extensions to the sides so it will close nicely OR just make the cover a bit larger than you think you'll need so it will wrap and zip shut nicely.

The notebook cover opened up. I make pencil pockets on the left and used a 22-24 inch zipper all the way around. When gauging the size for your cover, think about the thickness of the zipper tape. If your notebook is really thick, you may want to add some fabric extensions to the sides so it will close nicely OR just make the cover a bit larger than you think you’ll need so it will wrap and zip shut nicely.  And you can see in the center how I had fun quilting AND used a small bit of ribbon at the top ends of the zipper and at the bottom to make a nice, clean finish.

My notebook cover, opened up, shows the ribbon extends across the back, too.

My notebook cover, opened up, shows the ribbon extends across the back, too.

I hope you’ve enjoyed these additional options for the patterns I shared in my Quilting Arts TV segment and in QA Holidays 2014!  Remember to use the link on the left if you decide to go shopping at the online Interweave Store–it may get you some discounts!  Or click on this one right here to go directly to the Holiday issue!

Here’s the list of the bloghoppers with links.   If you haven’t had a chance to visit already, please do.  Some of these folks I know, but others are new to me so I’m really looking forward to seeing  (or have really enjoyed seeing)g their blogposts and blogs!

Enjoy!

by Sarah Ann Smith at September 20, 2014 10:20 AM

Cynthia St. Charles

Down to the Timberline Trailhead.

 We paused for a quick photo, then on down the trail we went.
 Nobody got wet during any of the crossings.

by Cynthia St Charles (noreply@blogger.com) at September 20, 2014 06:00 AM

September 19, 2014

Natalya Aikens

back to school!

Are you tired yet at looking at only Wordless Wednesdays here? I am! Summer is very busy around these parts with kid excursions, camps, travel and all other things that summer with children entails... But now it's back to the school routine, the after-school routine and back-to-the-studio routine. Woo hooo!!! As much as I enjoy planned and not, spur-of-a-moment and crazy activities of summer, I also love the dependability of routine.

So back to our regularly scheduled programming here, aside from WW. I have a few blog posts planned to share some delightful sights that I saw over the summer and I'll also fill you in on the goings on in my studio.

If you are ever in upstate NY, north of Albany, I highly recommend a visit to this little gem of a museum. Located on the grounds of the Russian Orthodox Holy Trinity Monastery, (which makes you feel as though you are in the Russian countryside) it's actually geared toward the non-Russian speaking visitor. The museum contains wonderful artifacts of representing four centuries of books and art in Russia. I thought I'd share with you the few that really captured my attention.
a detail from the Book of Gospels circa 1575...handwritten....
Book of the Twelve Great Feasts from 1825, also handwritten...
Gold-work detail from a Regimental Standard 1875
more gold-work from the Standard
Gorgeous cover of a book titled The Tzar's Hunt 1896
detail of gold-work from an Epigonation from the late 20th century
exquisite gold-work on a Shroud from the late 19th century
Hope you enjoyed this little tour of Russian history..

by Natalya Aikens (noreply@blogger.com) at September 19, 2014 06:47 PM

Margaret Cooter

Blast from the past - three-wheeler

Photographed in 2012. It’s either a Reliant Rialto, successor of the Reliant Robin, or a Reliant Robin. It was popular because it could be taxed at motorcycle rates, a considerable saving. The engine is in front and drives the rear axle, while steering is via the wheel in front. The Robin was manufactured in the UK between 1973 and 1981.

"In 1989, Reliant produced a new and totally revamped Robin featuring a new fibreglass body, and increased engine power. This Robin was face lifted again in 1999 when the final version was launched ... with completely new panels, and Opel Corsa front lamps. ... this hatchback-only model lasted until February 2001 when Reliant announced the end of production." (via)

by Margaret Cooter (noreply@blogger.com) at September 19, 2014 09:28 AM

Rayna Gillman

time warp

This is what happens when I come back from the West Coast and am still on California time.  I am up till all hours (it's almost 1:30 a.m but my body thinks it's 10:30) then I sleep till 9:30 am and am eating 2 breakfasts and multiple other meals because I'm starving at the wrong hour and then at the right hour. ARGH.

The sum of my day: sorting through the mail, doing laundry, unpacking supplies, and finding   looking for hanging sticks in correct sizes for all my quilts. I can see that I shall have to get out the saw for the sticks and repair/redo sleeves that have had holes cut in them for the Walker hanging system. And yes, I need to make a few labels. Needing to do all that hand sewing makes me wish I were a tv watcher (but not enough to actually BE one).

I unpacked, heat set and washed some fabrics I printed at the end of class.  They are the final layer on my ugly demo fabrics for the Portland workshop.  We worked with glue screens and after I improved a student's fabric with this particular screen, I went to work on my own.  I'm really happy with them (which doesn't take much because they were dreadful). Now I have to figure out how I am going to use them, eventually.
I was trying to use up as much paint as possible so I wouldn't have to cart it home.  I am seriously thinking that in the future, I will teach surface design only within driving distance of my home so I can pack all those supplies in the car and not have to schlep a 50 lb. suitcase around the country.  I am too old and decrepit to do this any more. So THERE!

Puttered around the house today but tomorrow morning I will attempt to beat the hordes to the supermarket and stock up on food for Rosh Hashanah dinner Wednesday night.  Not only is my refrigerator pathetically empty, I have to cook over the next 4 days and set the table. This is why I am clearing my quilts off the dining table.  

Ok, it's almost 2:am eastern time and I had better scoot to bed or I will not be up early enough to beat the supermarket crowds.

by noreply@blogger.com (Rayna) at September 19, 2014 05:48 AM

Cynthia St. Charles

Rainy Departure from Timberline Lake


 There was a little break in the drizzle and so we broke camp and packed up.  The clouds were hanging over Silver Run Peak as we crossed out of the Timberline Lake basin.

by Cynthia St Charles (noreply@blogger.com) at September 19, 2014 06:00 AM

September 18, 2014

Olga Norris

A fertile period

I do so love this time of year.  It is always true that there are changes around in plants from day to day, but these days now - and somehow I feel it more than in Spring - the changes are quite beautiful.  The decaying too is beautiful, perhaps because the demise is a precursor to new birth.
It demands visual immersion and sparks so many ideas.  Just now I am trying to think only about my own experiences, but there is so much else going on that is disturbing between humans.  Helplessly, selfishly, I am trying to focus on my own tiny environment.
  - a design in progress which has come out of it all.

by Olga Norris (noreply@blogger.com) at September 18, 2014 11:04 PM

Terry Grant

Granada—Flamenco and Pomegranates

We have had such a wonderful time in Granada! It is an incredible, beautiful city, with a rich and fascinating history. My daughter, Emily, spent a term studying in Granada when she was in college, and it has fascinated me ever since hearing her descriptions and seeing her photos. It is here that the Moorish influence in Spain is probably strongest, giving it a different flavor from the other cities we have visited.

One thing Granada is famous for is Flamenco—the dance and the music. Last night we went to a Flamenco performance. You never know, when you buy tickets for something like this, whether you will be seeing the real thing or something hokey that has been trumped up for tourists. What we saw seemed pretty great and authentic (but what do we know...?)

It was a very exciting, very intense performance. Nothing dainty about Flamenco. We loved it.

As we have walked around this city I started noticing a lot of images of pomegranates, including on this street cover for city water access. I was curious and learned that "granada" is the Spanish word for pomegranite. The city was not necessarily named for the fruit. It may have come from an Arab word that sounds similar, but nevertheless the city has adopted the fruit as its emblem. Once I noticed them, I started seeing them everywhere.


On the sidewalks

Carved into the pews in the Cathedral

On local pottery

Sidewalk barriers

On a fountain

And today when we visited the gardens of the Alhambra, I saw actual pomegranates growing on trees.

Today's visit to the Alhambra was incredible and will be a post of its own one of these days. I took so many photos I really need to carefully edit and select.

Tomorrow we head off to Seville.

 

 

by Terry Grant (noreply@blogger.com) at September 18, 2014 01:05 PM

Margaret Cooter

Blast from the past - the start of Poetry Thursday

What is now Poetry Thursday on this blog had an unwitting start, a follow-on from a book project that involved memorising ten sonnets. Initially I tried to memorise a short poem a week, and later this morphed into researching the poem and its author ... and finding a picture to go with it. (Sometimes the picture came first.)

But the first poem memorised was only six lines long, and though the exact words escape me, "it" is very much with me, and very apt in a year commemorating the start of the First World War. The poem is by Rudyard Kipling, a writer with a sad childhood, sent away by his parents in India, to England to school, at the tender age of 6. The personal history of the writer is very much with me too.


 A Dead Statesman

I could not dig: I dared not rob:
Therefore I lied to please the mob.
Now all my lies are proved untrue
And I must face the men I slew.
What tale shall serve me here among
Mine angry and defrauded young?

by Margaret Cooter (noreply@blogger.com) at September 18, 2014 09:50 AM

Kyra Hicks

Quilter Cassandra Stancil Gunkel to Speak at Drake Well Museum

Quilter and historian Cassandra Stancil Gunkel will speak on Friday, Sept. 26, at 7 p.m., at Drake Well Museum in Titusville, PA on the topic “The Underground Railroad in Quilts?” Professor Gunkel will examine the controversial questions  - did quilts guide escapes? She's also have historical and reproduction quilts to showcase. The talk is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be served.  Enjoy!

by Kyra (noreply@blogger.com) at September 18, 2014 09:00 AM

Cynthia St. Charles

Morning at Timberline Lake

 We had some light rain (and voracious mosquitoes) that forced us to make an early night of it.  It was still showering in the morning (and the bugs were still out in force) when we got up.  Nevertheless, we tried a bit of pre-breakfast fishing (no success).


 Breakfast at camp.


by Cynthia St Charles (noreply@blogger.com) at September 18, 2014 06:00 AM

September 17, 2014

Sarah Ann Smith

England 2014: Sutton Hoo and the British Museum (first Monday)

The Sutton Hoo Burial Treasures at the British Museum, London

The Sutton Hoo Burial Treasures at the British Museum, London

In 1978 I spent a semester in school in London.  It was pass-fail, not grades, so I passed.  But my time and interests were elsewhere:  I went to museums and the theatre (inexpensive same-day tickets) every week.  Every weekend, well almost every one, I went somewhere in the country by train, staying at youth hostels.   It was a most amazing few months, and some of the images have stayed with me since I was 19.  Some of those images are from the British Museum‘s exhibit of the phenomenal Sutton Hoo Burial Ship treasures which date to about 724 AD.  A decade or so ago, I learned that one could now VISIT the site where the ship was dug up, and that began my quest to return to England.  Before Eli and I went to East Anglia, however, I wanted him to see what had stayed with me all these decades.  The buckles above are just two of the samples–the intricacy of these small works is simply phenomenal, the imagery enticing.

We reached the museum mid afternoon, having been up well over 30 hours (overnight flight in a too-warm airplane included), so Eli kinda hit the wall and didn’t look much.  And it was crowded.  Beyond belief crowded.  The line into the ladies room took over half an hour–Eli actually sent a text wondering what had become of me!  I wanted Eli to see the Rosetta Stone and the Elgin Marbles since he is studying Latin.

This is the horde of humanity around the case with the Rosetta Stone.  UGH.  Too many people!

This is the horde of humanity around the case with the Rosetta Stone. UGH. Too many people!

Eventually, we got close:

THE Rosetta Stone

THE Rosetta Stone

Yep, the one, the original, the stone that helped humanity learn to read Egyptian heiroglyphics.  But what crowds.  We ended up being too tired to find the Elgin Marbles that day.  By the time we returned to London, we decided that we couldn’t cope with the hairy hordes and did not return to the Museum.  I hope some day to return, but I think it will be during a snowstorm in January just to avoid the masses!

But I did get to take many photos up in the Sutton Hoo exhibit, where the display cases and signage are vastly improved over 1978.

Just LOOK at this amazing ring pin; this one is probably almost 4 inches in diameter, and that pin could be lethal!

Just LOOK at this amazing ring pin; this one is probably almost 4 inches in diameter, and that pin could be lethal!

The case with a selection of items, the above pin is on the left.

The case with a selection of items, the above pin is on the left.

The most stunning item from the Sutton Hoo find is this mask.  They believe the ship was for the king of the Anglo-Saxons in East Anglia and dates to circa 724 a.d.  These are the remnants of the helmet.

The most stunning item from the Sutton Hoo find is this mask. They believe the ship was for the king of the Anglo-Saxons in East Anglia and dates to circa 724 a.d. These are the remnants of the helmet.

Based on the fragments and knowledge about contemporary helmets and design, they have made this piece to show what it would have looked like at the time of burial, including the garnets on the eyebrow ridges.  Simply phenomenal artistry and craftsmanship.

Based on the fragments and knowledge about contemporary helmets and design, they have made this piece to show what it would have looked like at the time of burial, including the garnets on the eyebrow ridges. Simply phenomenal artistry and craftsmanship.

More every-day implements and artifacts.

More every-day implements and artifacts.

And I am always intrigued by how people lived in olden times.  This pot would have been hung from a ridgeline/rafter post over a fire.

And I am always intrigued by how people lived in olden times. This pot would have been hung from a ridgeline/rafter post over a fire.

The original gourd had long since rotted away, but the intricate metalwork survived, so they made this wooden vessel to go with the metalwork and show how it was originally made.

The original gourd had long since rotted away, but the intricate metalwork survived, so they made this wooden vessel to go with the metalwork and show how it was originally made.  Just think of the designs–in calligraphy, quilting, you name it!

Another buckle component.  Look at the faces in those round areas!

Another buckle component. Look at the faces in those round areas!  If I recall, this is probably three inches or so tall?   The level of detail and workmanship simple awes me.

Then back to the hotel to collapse!  Time for a good night's sleep before a long and happy Tuesday. I took this picture of Notting Hill station (remember the movie with Hugh Grant?  Yep, that Notting Hill, which is a district in London not far from our Tube stop).

Then back to the hotel to collapse! Time for a good night’s sleep before a long and happy Tuesday. I took this picture of Notting Hill station (remember the movie with Hugh Grant? Yep, that Notting Hill, which is a district in London not far from our Tube stop).  It is one of the stations that hasn’t been gussied up and still has its old character.

So those are the artifacts that sent me back to England–I wanted to see them again, not just in photos, and go to where they had been found.  That would happen on Thursday, but we had two phenomenal days before that one!  There’s more to come!

by Sarah Ann Smith at September 17, 2014 02:34 PM

Cynthia St. Charles

Fishing at Timberline


 Fishing at Timberline was outstanding!  We caught a lot of nice sized fish right away.   This lake contains a self sustaining population of Brook trout (not a native species).  They were especially colorful because they were spawning.



by Cynthia St Charles (noreply@blogger.com) at September 17, 2014 06:00 AM

Gerrie Congdon

Go Figure

stowe_lowres

Grabbed this from my daughter, Lisa’s blog because it suits what I am feeling about my creative life. Since we decided to move, about a year ago, my creative life has taken a back seat. I have been pondering lately about whether or not I should continue making art. It is more difficult for me to get in my groove – sneak down to the studio and play and find something that gets my juices flowing. My little studio is not as easy for me. It has been too hot to be there. I have felt distracted and unmotivated with only little bursts of art making that has made me happy.

dancingkelpquilted

Then, this week, I found out that my Kelp Dance quilt sold at the American Art Company gallery in Tacoma. I was told that only two pieces in the show have sold. That bit of news has buoyed my spirits (plus the fun of getting back to printing art cloth with Rayna last week). So, I look forward to cooler weather and more time to get my creative groove on. Never mind that deadlines for all the important shows have just passed me by!! There is always something coming up.

I barely survived 4.5 hours in the dentist chair yesterday morning. It was grueling. They removed two crowns and a bridge and prepared my eye tooth for a crown. I must say that the temporary dentures look quite good. I came home and got a fever and spent the rest of the day wrapped in a blanket. I feel a bit better today. I hope to go to SAQA tomorrow and then Thursday, I will have my STASH group here.

 

by Gerrie at September 17, 2014 04:29 AM

September 16, 2014

Rayna Gillman

Point Lobos

Got to the hotel here yesterday and took a walk down to the Cliff House restaurant for dinner.
There was a lot of sun, so I shot these rather blindly -- but oh, my - how lovely the landscape just at the Pacific Ocean.

Shangri-la in the distance, and just look at nature's color combination.  If this were a painting I would think it was trite.

Dinner at the Cliff House was pretty divine, too.
Had a trek back up the long and steep hill, which I hope walked off a calorie or two -- but not sure.
This morning I have been luxuriating in the sun on the patio, catching up on some things I wanted to read.  Flight check-in pretty soon and then I might take a walk.  Tonight, giving a lecture at the San Francisco Quilt Guild and am looking forward to it.

Tomorrow, back to New Jersey to take care of all the STUFF waiting for me.  It's been a great trip!

by noreply@blogger.com (Rayna) at September 16, 2014 06:25 PM

Olga Norris

Seasonal overlap

We are enjoying a sunny period between seasons.  And it is real warmth developing as we look out at breakfast time.
The annuals still blossoming away while the trees are laden with ripening berries.
Meanwhile, indoors, I have been busy preparing lino plates. These are a few of those piling up ready for several days of printing to come.

by Olga Norris (noreply@blogger.com) at September 16, 2014 02:42 PM

Terry Grant

Travel day—to Granada

After our fun night last night, I didn't sleep. I tossed and turned and couldn't get comfortable. I was grateful, but unrested when morning arrived. So getting on a bus for a 5-hour ride wasn't a bad thing. I slept on the bus. I'm sure I had my mouth hanging open and I had my goofy blow-up neck pillow, but I was unashamed. The only person I knew on the bus was Ray and he's seen worse. This is the way of the traveler. Somehow I often sleep better sitting up on a bus than in a comfy, but unfamiliar hotel bed. It's a mystery.

We arrived in Granada mid-afternoon and found our Airbnb in the historic Albayzin area. It is pretty great. The building, much like the one in Barcelona, is ancient on a narrow little hillside street, but this one is much cozier, with furniture and a well-appointed kitchen. It even has a washer and we are doing some laundry tonight. We did a little walkabout earlier, checked out the neighborhood, had a cold beer in the plaza, bought groceries and retired to our little home away from home for the evening. Our place has two balconies and the views knocked us out. I will leave you with tonight's views.

Looking down toward Plaza Nuevo
Looking up at The Alhambra.
Pinch me. I think I'm dreaming. . .

 

by Terry Grant (noreply@blogger.com) at September 16, 2014 01:27 PM

Virginia A. Spiegel

Trunk Show Tomorrow!

SpiegelLibraryTalk400

I have almost thirty artworks ready to go for this trunk show/talk tomorrow, September 17, at the Byron (IL) Public Library.  If you would like to attend and don’t care to call the library, let me know and I will let the library know you will be attending.

The emphasis will definitely be on SHOW and not too much tell.  I have artwork from my first traditional quilt straight through artwork I have just finished.

It’s been fun to look at artwork I haven’t seen for awhile.  I’ve realized that, although my topics have varied, my artwork is characterized by hand-painted fabrics in bold colors, horizontal orientation with vertical stitching, and, frequently, a mad love of tiny, tiny, pieces.

by Virginia at September 16, 2014 11:08 AM

Margaret Cooter

Blast from the past - Imber church

Last year we stopped at Imber on the way to north Devon, as it was one of the village's annual open days - it's part of the army training grounds on Salisbury Plain. The church dates back to the 12th century and is now in the care of the Church Conservation Trust. The caretaker has beehives of a rare pure strain of bees, isolated by distance from contamination - honey was being sold. Also at the church was a display of the history of the village, and we chatted with a man who had been born in the village - the entire civilian population was evicted in 1943 to provide an exercise area for American troops preparing for the invasion of Europe.

In the church tower are these 17th century paintings of the changes of bells to be rung -
ringing the changes
 The ring of six bells was installed in 2010; wonder how much use those ropes get? -
An atmospheric place -

by Margaret Cooter (noreply@blogger.com) at September 16, 2014 09:34 AM

Cynthia St. Charles

Timberline Lake Backpacking

 We took our 8 year old grandson on his first backpacking trip this summer.  We went to Timberline Lake because the weather there was expected to be milder than some of our other options.  Above is a picture of Timberline Lake as we arrived.  We had sunshine all the way up the trail (hot), but the clouds had arrived at the same time we reached the lake, so it began to feel a bit cooler (almost too cool, really).  The first order of business was to find our campsite, but the second was to filter water.  The two pictures below show Airus and Joe filtering ice cold water from the lake.


by Cynthia St Charles (noreply@blogger.com) at September 16, 2014 06:00 AM

Dijanne Cevaal

Crossing Oceans

All packed up from the Viville Quilt Expo and off to the 20th birthday celebrations of  Carrefour Europeen du Patchwork at Ste Marie aux Mines.

I shall be  spending quite some time at the Crossing Oceans stand as I have  pieces of work in this wonderful exhibition which has been curated by Jane Rollason. The group consists of Jane Rollasom. Hilary Beattie, Charlotte Yde, Irene McWilliam, Elain Quel, Lin Hsin-Chen, Bergen Rose, Ineke Berlyn, Christiane Kuhr, Pat Archibald , Kay Haerland, Frieda Anderson and myself. We have  five small pieces and one large piece each. I decided to explore olive trees.

And Jane Rollason's lovely tulip arrangement with its beautiful colours!



We have a spare bed in the cabin we have rented at Ste Marie ( about 20 minutes from Ste marie) if anyone is interested. The cost per night is reasonable and I know  accommodation is always at a premium on this  weekend of exhibitions. If you are interested please email me  and I can give you details.

And finally a new panel for the medieval project- a Chartres king. He is  the same size as the queen ( approx 8 x 18 inches  20 cm x 45 cm). The scale of the figure is also the same. The cost of the panel is $20 plus postage ( which is $3) email me if you are interested 


by Dijanne Cevaal (noreply@blogger.com) at September 16, 2014 01:02 AM

September 15, 2014

Sarah Ann Smith

500 Traditional Quilts, published again!

What a THRILL!   I’ve been published many times now (how lucky am I?!!!), but I am elated to share that I my traditional quilting has also made the cut.  I have three quilts in 500 Traditional Quilts, juried by Karey Patterson Bresenhan, founder and CEO of Quilts, Inc., and founder and Director Emeritus of International Quilt Festival.  The book is part of Lark Book’s “500 Series,” and I was proud to be included also in 500 Art Quilts. You can find 500 Traditional Quilts here (on Amazon, available other places too) and 500 Art Quilts here.  My blogpost about 500 Art Quilts is here.  What is so wonderful is that I made the cut in blind jurying:  that means the juror has no idea who made which quilt, you are juried in on the basis of the quality of the quilt.

I'm in 500 Traditional Quilts, Karey Patterson Bresenhan, juror.  Well, three of my QUILTS are in this book, not me!

I’m in 500 Traditional Quilts, Karey Patterson Bresenhan, juror. Well, three of my QUILTS are in this book, not me!

My three quilts included in this book are From the Schooner Coast, Haleakala Sunrise and Nourish the Body, Nourish the Soul.  Avid quilters will recognize the works and names of many of the quilting world’s top traditional quilters, so I am particularly honored that three of my quilts made the cut.  Even better, the two Hawaiian-style quilts of mine will be in an exhibit of selected works from this book that will debut at International Quilt Market and Festival this October-November.  For me, this is huge: my work meets the standards for publication and exhibiting at what is probably the most prestigious quilt show in the world.  WOW!

The theme for this spread is clearly sailing ships.  Mine is the blue one in the middle, with a detail of the quilting no less!  This quilt is called From The Schooner Coast.

The theme for this spread is clearly sailing ships. Mine is the blue one in the middle, with a detail of the quilting no less! This quilt is called From The Schooner Coast.

 

Any reader of this blog will immediately recognize my Haleakala Sunrise quilt which is the background for this website.  I just love bright, clear "Caribbean" colors.  This was my first original Hawaiian-style design, and I still love it and Hawaiian quilts in general.

Any reader of this blog will immediately recognize my Haleakala Sunrise quilt which is the background for this website. I just love bright, clear “Caribbean” colors. This was my first original Hawaiian-style design, and I still love it and Hawaiian quilts in general.

Nourish the Body, Nourish the Soul, is on the left.  I made this quilt to be in my Threadwork Unraveled book, a "bible" of thread used on/in a sewing machine.  Due to length, we ended up cutting the applique section out of the book, but I remember finishing the design for the center block while sitting on the floor of Joshua's hospital room in 2007 after he was hit by a car (and it's somewhere back in the July/Aug 2007 blogposts!).  So glad he is completely well, doing well, the book did great, and my quilting career actually exists!

Nourish the Body, Nourish the Soul, is on the left. I made this quilt to be in my Threadwork Unraveled book, a “bible” of thread used on/in a sewing machine. Due to length, we ended up cutting the applique section out of the book, but I remember finishing the design for the center block while sitting on the floor of Joshua’s hospital room in 2007 after he was hit by a car (and it’s somewhere back in the July/Aug 2007 blogposts!). So glad he is completely well, doing well, the book did great, and my quilting career actually exists!

I have to be honest:  I have not “read” this entire book, yet.  This is a book to be savored. Dip into it, browse the beauty in its pages.   Yes, I am an art quilter.  But first and foremost I am a quilter, and these quilts are art even though they are traditional–I love ALL types of quilting.  Karey called these quilts “the crème to la crème of traditional quiltmaking today.”   I can’t wait to see the exhibit of selected quilts from the book in Houston (I’m teaching again this year, but blessedly have a couple days to be a civilian and just enjoy the show).   Hope to see you there!

 

by Sarah Ann Smith at September 15, 2014 04:19 PM

Terry Grant

Last day in Madrid

Today we took in the Reina Sofia Museum, which houses the works of the more modern masters, including Picasso's Guernica. When we were in Europe in 1972 we saw Guernica on exhibit in Paris. Franco was in power at that time, in Spain, and Picasso, a Spaniard by birth had declared that he would not exhibit his work in Spain as long as Franco ruled. Both are, of course, now dead, the monarchy was restored in Spain and Picasso's work has returned to his native country.

Along with Picasso, the museum's collection includes absolutely wonderful works, including many artists from Spain, but from around the world as well. Here are a few pieces that stood out for me.

"inspiration" by Josefa Tolra. I was not familiar with this artist, but this spoke to me. A Google search turns up much more by her.

"The Goring of the Woman Bullfighter" by Jose Caballero. Reminded me of the wonderful Almodovar movie "Talk to Her" about the same subject.

"Antonio and Carmen" by Antonio Lopez. Something very touching about this double portrait.

And what a treat to see good old Rothko in Spain and such good Spanish colors!

When my brain could absorb no more and my feet were rebelling, we stopped and had lunch in the museum's space-agey cafe.


This evening we met up with Keiko, an old work colleague of Ray's who has been hiking the Santiago de Compostela trail and was in Madrid today—Would not have connected at all except that she posted where she was on Facebook. The three of us went to the fabulous San Miguel Market where you can pick up small plates of prepared food to eat on the spot, or shop to take home.
You pick up your little plates and a glass of wine and find a spot at the crowded little tables in the center of the market. As luck, or fate, would have it, we ended up sharing a table with a couple of delightful guys—American Craig who is an IT guy (like Ray and Keiko) for the US State Department, and his French friend, Patric, who is a restaurant owner in Paris. The food was delicious and the company and conversation was great. At one point Patric, in his charming accent, gesturing around our table and then toward the multicultural throng in the busy market, said, "why can't the world be more like this..."

Tomorrow we are off to Granada.

 

by Terry Grant (noreply@blogger.com) at September 15, 2014 03:34 PM

Virginia A. Spiegel

Buy Art for a Good Cause TODAY!

benefit-auction-mosaic

The Studio Art Quilt Associates Benefit Auction begins today with Section 1 bidding opening at 2 p.m. EDT.

It’s a reverse auction with the price dropping each day through Saturday.  The Benefit Auction continues with three more grouping of artworks in September and October.  All the details on how the auction works are here.

Proceeds from the Benefit Auction support SAQA’s exhibitions, publications, and education outreach.

by Virginia at September 15, 2014 10:30 AM

Margaret Cooter

Off to Amsterdam

A little holiday. Museums and walking around and that sort of thing. Last time we were there it looked like this -

by Margaret Cooter (noreply@blogger.com) at September 15, 2014 09:35 AM

Neki Rivera

i have something to show


this is how far i've come.  patching gifted and dyed scraps to make a  summer bed cover .i still have a long way to go. this is just a meter square and my bed is 150x 190,  hoping i'll have enough scraps. ai vat is on its last leg , don't want to add more ai to it. it still dyes, but the colors come somewhat tealish. motainai, motainai, but this is not a patchwork.
on another subject already sent my entry to the juried show. now i just have to wait and see.



neki desu
Creative Commons License 

by noreply@blogger.com (neki desu) at September 15, 2014 08:00 AM

Cynthia St. Charles

First Backpacking Trip for Eight Year Old Grandson

 There was not a very big window of time for backpacking this summer.  We watch the weather and the bugs to determine when we can maximize the potential for success.  We did have one evening that appeared promising and we wanted to take our eight year old grandson, Airus on his first outing.  We wanted to be able to evaluate his stamina and enthusiasm before planning a much longer trip.  Here are pictures from the Timberline trailhead and another along the trail going up.  We had partly cloudy weather and warmish temperatures for the hike into Timberline Lake.  It is 5 miles to the lake.  The trailhead is along the West Fork Road, about 11 miles in.  The elevation of the trailhead is at about 7,500 feet and this area was burned in a wildfire in 2007 (I think).

The trail passes through the burn area for about 3 miles.  That means 3 miles without shade.... and it means looking at a lot of blackend tree trunks.  Airus could not resist playing with the charcoal found everywhere.  He drew on rocks and logs with pieces of charcoal, blackened his hands with charcoal dust and left charcoal handprints all around. 

by Cynthia St Charles (noreply@blogger.com) at September 15, 2014 06:00 AM

September 14, 2014

Rayna Gillman

mangoneidas y diablitos

This afternoon, my friend Rachel and I took a walk around the Mission district -- a gritty neighborhood I loved when I was here last year.

We stopped in the Cut Loose clothing factory outlet and (either sadly or fortunately) nothing looked good on either of us.  But it was great stuff.  After that, we had pupusas at the indoor food market -- totally enjoyable.  Pupusas are a Salvadoran food  made of cornmeal,stuffed with cheese and your choice of whatever else: pumpkin, greens, pork, etc. and served with spicy cabbage slaw and hot sauce.  Yummy.  I think I need to find a recipe and make these when I get home.

As we walked, we passed a restaurant with what looked like thousands or people standing on line (or  in line if you are not from New York) and the line stretched around the corner.  I stopped and asked some guy what they were giving away and he said "nothing. This place has the best burritos in the world." 
 A few doors down,  we passed a sign congratulating La taqueria for being selected by Nate Silver as the world's best burrito.  We were not about to go back and join the line.  I stopped to take a picture of this sign because it tickled me. And Rachel and I continued on our way.
We saw a lot of teenagers eating what looked like frozen gazpacho and in another block we discovered what it was.  A guy with a stand on the next corner was pouring stuff into a cup, adding a biig scoop of snow cone ice, adding more stuff, and people were standing in line for that, too.
We recognized it as the frozen gazpacho -- good guess, but not quite.  It was mangoneidas y diablitos -- a concoction of mango, ice, mango syrup, tomato-y hot sauce, cayenne pepper, more mango, more hot sauce.
 People were also skipping the hot sauce and having the mango and ice with other stuff, like coconut syrup, frozen strawberries, and who knows what else. Too sweet to contemplate.  We opted to try
y diabliitos because the combination of sweet and spicy appealed to us.  Not knowing whether we would like it, we decided to buy one and share it. It was fabulous!  Here is Rachel with it.
And yrs truly, checking it out before I dug into it with my fork.  Yes - you eat it with a fork, not a spoon. Can't figure out why, unless he had run out of spoons before we got there.  And that thing that looks like a straw is a plastic thing covered with what Rachel said tasted like guava paste and cayenne.


You have to know I am going to try this one at home.  Seems to me it would make a great drink with some gin added:-).  I'll let you know.

by noreply@blogger.com (Rayna) at September 14, 2014 09:45 PM

Terry Grant

Eyes on Madrid

After our long museum day yesterday we decided to get out and see the city today. We started at Plaza Mayor, the very oldest part of Madrid. It has been the scene of many historic events, including the public execution of heretics during the Spanish Inquisition. Today there was nothing more exciting than a small flea market consisting mostly of old coins and stamps, and old men haggling over them. We wandered along the stalls and I bought a small pair of old and interesting folding scissors.

The closer and higher I looked, the more interesting details I found.

We left the Plaza Mayor and walked through some neighborhoods, getting a little lost and very tired and decided this was not the most efficient way to explore the city. So we headed down to Plaza del Sol and bought tickets for the big red tourist bus. It turned out to be a great idea. You can hop off the bus almost anywhere along the line, explore, or have a meal, then hop on the next bus that comes along all day and into the evening. There is a recorded commentary, in numerous languages, you can listen to as you ride along.

As I had discovered at Plaza Mayor, there is a lot to be seen by looking up.

We stopped partway through the tour and had lunch—mine was a pizza with an egg on it. I ordered it without the egg, which sounded a little wierd, but it arrived with egg, so I ate it and the egg was OK. When in Spain....


We got back on the bus and finished the first half of the tour, got off near our hotel and came back for a little rest and to check messages, then went back for the second half this evening. It was a good day! Madrid is a pretty magnificent place.

 

by Terry Grant (noreply@blogger.com) at September 14, 2014 04:38 PM

Gerrie Congdon

Fabric Printing Day Two

printedfabric2

Whew, I am exhausted from my week of hosting Rayna and the two days of workshop. I totally crashed last night – I might as well have been in a coma. I took Rayna to the airport this morning and then we went to the farmer’s market. I spent the afternoon dozing and working on SDA membership stuff.

I came away from the workshop with a few pretty good pieces. The piece up at the top was transformed from this. It was first printed with newspaper resist on a screen. Then I added yellow orange circles and some black marks made with a mesh type of ribbon. Finally, I used a syringe to add the squiggly lines.

periwinkleblueandolivegreen

Here is a detail:

printedfabric2detail

This was another silk scarf that had some very pale marks when I used an anemic black dye for printing. I used the newspaper resist screen and olive green ink followed by purple lines using one of my favorite Stencil Girl stencils.

renewedscarf

This piece was started with newspaper resist and then I used the school glue screen with mix of orange and yellow. The screen was starting to break down and I love how it turned out.

 

fabricprint

Here is a detail:

redorangeturquoisedetail

This next piece started as a piece of muslin that I was using for test prints.

printedfabric3

I kept printing on it and then painted the whole thing with Dynaflow chartreuse paint.

The next piece was something I  had in my stash. You can see the bottom section. I am not sure what I did to get those circles and marks. I printed over it with the glue resist screen of circles using purple paint. Not excited about it, but who knows what use I might find for it.

purplegluescreen

Lastly, here is my printing surface after a lot of printing. I always love how the printing surface is so spontaneous looking.

printsurface

All in all, it was a great week. I am not looking forward to Monday. I am having 4 hours of dental work as they remove the disintegrating bridge from my upper right side. I will get a temporary put in and hope I don’t have to wait to long for the final fix.

by Gerrie at September 14, 2014 04:20 AM

September 13, 2014

Margaret Cooter

More small changes at Cloud Cuckooland Studio

 The things you find! The plans you had for them! And - what to do with them now?

The bits of old pottery obsessively collected from the foreshore and (surprisingly) Hampstead Heath -
I had an idea about drawing or painting them, a la early Lisa Milroy...

Collections of threads for some project or other -
They'll simply go back into the thread drawers, projects terminated.

"Pens to sort" - which of them still write, and ... who needs so many pens anyway???
 A little project for a rainy day.

It's scraps that give me the greatest fabric pleasure - here, from a bag on the floor, we have some tulle, some wools (for rug hooking), and silks (for JQs and suchlike projects) -
 They need to go in separate places, and though my smaller bits of fabric are organised in a haberdashers cabinet of glass-fronted drawers, these don't fit into the classification - and reorganising that cabinet isn't going to happen soon. Plus, the scrapbox is rather full and it's not going to get sorted just yet either.

One thing I've learned is - what to leave alone "for now".

And speaking of fabric -
Can one person use all this white fabric in what's left of a lifetime? The dream was once to start everything from white fabric, dyeing or painting it as needed. There was also "the all-white patchwork" project, which never really got off the ground. Ah well, move on!

More paper! -
It's not good to keep paper rolled up, especially thicker paper. This will be rehoused soon.

What about the "portable projects" in their pouches?
These little books made of various papers will come along on my next trip, to be stitched with linen threads -
Boxes ... who doesn't collect boxes, who can resist a pretty container ... but what's in them that needs to be decided about -
It gets really trivial - a collection of thread ends!! These are from hand-sewing at the table-under-the-window; they just mount up. I've used similar collections for sandwiching between net and machining, a satisfyingly brainless activity, and we all have moments when a brainless, satisfying activity is called for ... but it would be easy and practical to simply empty the jar occasionally! -
Finally, another small delight - a reorganised area, under the table -
The press won't stay there (I plan to use it for printmaking, in a rudimentary sort of way), but its new location is yet to be decided. Meanwhile, moving the drawers closer to where the chair is makes that catch-all top drawer more accessible. Also, taking things out and looking at them made me think about getting a new cover for the portable ironing board,  about replacing the flooring with carpet tiles (red? orchid? not dark grey, not beige...), and about sorting out that sewing basket, bought in Oxford in 1982 ... last used last century!

With counter tops cleared, I'm ready to leave this alone for a while.


by Margaret Cooter (noreply@blogger.com) at September 13, 2014 08:19 PM

Rayna Gillman

On the road again


At Portland airport in the United Club,  brunching (early lunching) on cheese & crackers, yogurt, coffee, and ice. On my way to San Francisco to stay with a friend in the city and then give a lecture. Heading home on Wednesday.                                                               

In the meantime, I finally have time to revisit more of the wonderful fabrics printed in class on day two.
As I look at the pix I took, I'll share them with you.  The big fun was printing with glue on a screen. We prepared the screens at the end of day one and they dried overnight.  Such cool designs!
Here are examples of how fabrics can be saved: just print over them with a glue screen:-)  and work in layers!




This was a deconstructed piece (green layer) that Joyce wasnt happy with.  She printed with a grid and was in the process off adding those 3-D looking circles when I snapped this.
After yesterday's class ended, Gerrie and I packed up, rested our feet, and then went out with Mr. C to a wonderfull Catalan restaurant.  I tell you, the food in Portland is universally interesting and terrific.        

on to the next city...

by noreply@blogger.com (Rayna) at September 13, 2014 06:41 PM